Eudocia

Eudocia

(yo͞odō`shə), d. 460, Roman empress of the East; daughter of an Athenian Sophist. She was selected by PulcheriaPulcheria
, 399–453, Roman empress of the East (414–53), daughter of Arcadius and Eudoxia. She became coruler with her brother, Theodosius II, and regent in 414. Theodosius remained under her influence most of his life.
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 as the wife of Theodosius IITheodosius II,
401–50, Roman emperor of the East (408–50), son and successor of Arcadius. He preferred the study of theology and astronomy to public affairs, which he left to the guidance of his sister, Pulcheria—and, at times, to that of his wife Eudocia.
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, whom she married (421) after being baptized and changing her name from Athenaïs to Eudocia. She became powerful at court, but the victim of intrigues, she retired to Jerusalem, where she devoted herself to literary and charitable work. She embraced Eutychianism (see EutychesEutyches
, c.378–c.452, archimandrite in Constantinople, sponsor of Eutychianism, the first phase of Monophysitism. He was the leader in Constantinople of the most violent opponents of Nestorianism, among whom was Dioscurus, successor to St. Cyril (d.
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) but finally returned to orthodoxy.

Bibliography

See C. Diehl, Byzantine Portraits (1906, tr. 1927).

References in periodicals archive ?
His topics include the rhetorical context of biblical epics, why Christians wanted to imitate classical texts, Faltonia Betitia Proba's imitation of Virgil, and Eudocia Athenais' imitation of Homer.
Eudocia Quant, his favorite nurse at Dana Farber Cancer Center, Margaret Euri.
Thus, Peter flees the court of Theodosius II in Constantinople for Jerusalem; he flees Jerusalem for Gaza (attempting to avoid Eudocia and any requests she might make of him).
Her acquisition of portions of these relics for her own use underlines her status in the Jerusalem ecclesia, which is likewise emphasized by the attendance of the empress Eudocia at the deposition of the relics in Melania's new martyrion.
According to John Rufus, Eudocia had built a martyrium on the site of the saint's martyrdom to house his relics, and she asked Cyril of Alexandria to inter the relics "and to consecrate the beautiful temple which she had built outside the northern gate of the city.
In Heather's book there is a list of 'dramatis personae', which includes 92 men and just 3 women, all from one imperial family: Galla Placidia, sister of the emperor Honorius, her daughter Honoria, and granddaughter Eudocia.
17) "Ora va escluso che il Boccaccio possa essere stato tratto in inganno dall'aver trovato in qualche codice, unito al Centone Virgiliano, il Centone Omerico, che una tradizione attribuiva gia ad una Eudocia Augusta; egli infatti non afferma di scienza propria, ma riferisce la notizia come data da altri; e siccome una tale attribuzione non ritroviamo, ch'io sappia, negli scrittori a cui avrebbe potuto attingere il Boccaccio, non e improbabile che essa risalga ai dotti che il Certaldese frequentava, a Leonzio Pilato, per esempio [.
Educated, sensitive, gifted, the attractive Eudocia has had a life rich in acquaintances and cultural experiences and even involving a few attractive men.
It is a pity that Aelia Eudocia (also known as Augusta) gets only a brief mention (140-41) and that none of her work is translated.
We can point to the diary of the third-century martyr Perpetua, the complex and recondite Vergilian and Homeric centos ("stitch-verses") of the aristocrat Proba and the empress Eudocia, and perhaps one or two other arguable examples.
Usher, Homerocentones Eudociae Augustae (Stuttgart: Teubner, 1999), with discussion in Mark Usher, Homeric Stitchings: The Homeric Centos of the Empress Eudocia (Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield, 1998).
Dhouka accepts all known facts from established sources but formulates the relevant personalities as if they were fictional, especially Eudocia Macremvolitissa and other intriguing women.