Eugen Bleuler

(redirected from Eugene Bleuler)

Bleuler, Eugen

 

Born Apr. 30, 1857, in Zollikon, near Zürich; died there on July 15, 1939. Swiss psychiatrist and psychologist; professor at the University of Zürich from 1898 to 1927.

In his psychological research, following S. Freud and developing depth psychology, Bleuler used psychoanalytic methods to study the sphere of the unconscious. He also studied the “ambivalence of feelings,” a term that he introduced. (In addition, he introduced the terms “autism” and “schizophrenia,” which is also called Bleuler’s disease.) Bleuler studied the autistic thought process and schizophrenia. In collaboration with the Swiss psychologist C. G. Jung, Bleuler introduced the concepts of the affective complex and associative experiment into psychopathology. According to Bleuler, all living acts (so-called psychoids) have three basic characteristics: integrative ability, memory function, and expedient character.

WORKS

Naturgeschichte der Seele und ihres Bewusstwerdens, 2nd ed. Berlin, 1932.
Die Psychoide als Prinzip der organischen Entwicklung. Berlin, 1925.
Affektivität, Suggestibilität, Paranoia, 2nd ed. Halle, 1926.
Mechanismus—Vitalismus—Mnemismus. Berlin, 1931.
In Russian translation:
Rukovodstvo po psikhiatrii. Berlin, 1920.

REFERENCES

Kannabikh, Iu. V. Istoriia psikhiatrii. [Moscow], 1929.
References in periodicals archive ?
The term autism, meaning "living in self," was coined by Swiss Psychiatrist Eugene Bleuler in 1911 to describe self-absorption due to poor social relatedness in schizophrenia.