Eugénie Grandet

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Eugénie Grandet

wealth as raison d’être. [Fr. Lit.: Eugenie Grandet, Magill I, 258–260]
See: Greed
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Consequently, observe what happens: the Duchesse de Langeais(see "History of the Thirteen") makes herself a nun for the lack of ten minutes' patience; Judge Popinot (see "Commission in Lunacy") puts off till the morrow the duty of examining the Marquis d'Espard; Charles Grandet (see "Eugenie Grandet") goes to Paris from Bordeaux instead of returning by Nantes; and such events are called chance or fatality!
Eugenie Grandet is one of many novels in Scenes de la vie de Province that examine the harmful effects of social speculation on family and emotional life.
Before the onset of sound film in 1927, eighty-two adaptations of Balzac texts were either planned or produced (Doumens 2008), including films based on Le Colonel Chabert, Eugenie Grandet, La Duchesse de Langeais, and Le Pere Goriot.
The issue of (Catholic) charity is raised at various points, most notably in the context of La Messe de l'athee, but Mazaheri does not go on to discuss it in relation to Eugenie Grandet or L'Envers, the two novels that foreground it most obviously.
The powerful rereading of Eugenie Grandet, for example, might well have been prefaced by an adaptation of Proust's famous' Vous connaissez Rastignac?
The former concern is pursued in the first half of the book: Chapter 1, through a reading of Eugenie Grandet, analyses Balzac's under-standing of femininity in the first three decades of the nineteenth century; and Chapter 2 examines how Balzac's polemical bent is frequently belied by the social analysis he undertakes within his novels--in the context of Pierrette by analysing people who either choose not to marry or simply end up not marrying.
82-125 (selected passages for explication) Balzac's definition of "thought"; parallels among Descartes's "Je pense, donc je suis," Pascal's all-but-stated "Je pense, donc je m'ennuie," Chateaubriand's implied "Je m'ennuie, donc je suis," and the Balzacian dilemma, life-in-death or death-in-life, as developed in his characters' thought, ennui, will, power, and knowledge; Raphael's infernal contract with the skin; close reading of descriptive vocabulary, verb tenses, stylistic features, rhythm, and expressive words in representative passages from Le Pere Goriot, Illusions Perdues, and Eugenie Grandet will highlight temporal and other meanings of the skin and the relationship between the "philosophical studies" and the "social studies" of The Human Comedy
Eugenie Grandet Novel by Balzac, Honore de, first published in 1833 (revised edition, 1839).
Inspired by reading Guy de Maupassant's Une Vie (1883) to write a history of the relationships of mistresses and maids in French fiction, Susan Yates has examined five examples of French realist fiction, including Une Vie, Balzac's Eugenie Grandet (1833), Goncourt brothers' Germinie Lacerteux (1865), Flaubert's Un Coeur simple (1877), and Zola's Pot-Bouille (1882).
Eugenie Grandet, the young heiress to a fortune, who lives in the world but is not of it.
Some of the finest novels in the series include Eugenie Grandet, Le Pere Goriot, La Recherche de l'absolu (1834), and Cesar Birotteau (1837).
Memes un grand spirituel comme Dostoievsky commence sa carriere par une traduction d' Eugenie Grandet. Balzac est bien l'equivalent de Shake speare dans le genre romanesque, et c'est pour cela que depuis longtemps on a traduit non seulement toute La Comedie humaine--quelques quatre-vingt-dix ouvrages, dont certains n'ont pas grand interet, mais le nombre des chefs-d'oeuvres y est impressionnant--mais aussi Les Contes drolatiques et le theatre.