Eumenides


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Eumenides

(yo͞omĕn`ĭdēz): see FuriesFuries
or Erinyes
, in Greek and Roman religion and mythology, three daughters of Mother Earth, conceived from the blood of Uranus, when Kronos castrated him. They were powerful divinities that personified conscience and punished crimes against kindred blood,
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References in periodicals archive ?
The greatest play about the tension between law and justice is Aeschylus's "The Eumenides," a story of murder and vengeance in which the furies represent justice.
The greatest play about the tension between law and justice is Aeschylus's The Eumenides, a story of murder and vengeance in which the furies represent justice.
The literary hypotext for this is the last part of the Choephoroi and the Eumenides of Aeschylus.
synthesizes scholarship over the past three decades on political, social, and dramatic contexts of Eumenides and important issues it addresses such as justice and gender conflict.
To an audience of Titans the struggle in The Eumenides between gods and furies and the transformation of the furies into benevolent deities is pure melodrama" ("Defending Melodrama," in Melodrama, Themes in Drama 14 ed.
A prime example is the way the ancient Greeks were careful to call the Furies the Eumenides, or the Kindly Ones.
Welcome Eumenides," the title poem of her second book (1972), is told in the voice of a woman in service as a nurse during the Crimean War.
The third tragedy in the sequence, Eumenides (Kindly Ones), describes the consequences of the matricide, with the judgement and absolution of Orestes of the crime.
the servant and illegitimate child of Sutpen who eventually burns down the master's mansion--attempting, in effect, to end the Sutpen curse--is named Clytemnestra, implicitly reinforcing the novel's allusions to the Eumenides and other ghosts in the western literary tradition.
Euripides's Iphigeneia amongst the Taurians, for example, has been converted into a product of the Romantic era by Goethe in his Iphigenie; Sartre's Les Mouches is an existentialist reinterpretation of Aeschylus's Choephoroi and Eumenides.
First, apparently, he plays with the absence of the word genius, looking for it; second, he feels that he is at a sort of crossroad or in the presence of a chorus that demands to exercise his Greek memories, from Oedipus to Antigone, from the Eumenides to Helene.