Eunapius


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Eunapius

(yo͞onā`pēəs), b. c.347, Greek Neoplatonic philosopher, whose Lives of the Philosophers and Sophists is a most valuable primary source. His continuation of Dexippus' history is lost. Like many Neoplatonists he opposed Christianity.
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Hoff (1943) documented four species from the Reelfoot Lake region: Eunapius fragilis (Leidy, 1851), Heteromeyetiia tubisperma (Potts, 1881), Racekiela ryrleri (Potts, 1882), and Radiospongilla crateriformis (Potts, 1882).
(ed.): The fragmentary classicising historians of the Later Roman Empire: Eunapius, Olympiodorus, Priscus and Malchus.
Gesner's Latin translation: Et ille quidem in pulvere ense, abscisso capite, nemine lugente, / Tristi morte, divinus vir, extensus iacet.) (18) The gruesome torture and execution of Maximus is described in similar terms by Eunapius in his Life of Maximus 460 (tr.
(29) Although such specific contextualising is suspect, Bowra does note the poem's pointedness, double meanings, and the 'relatively kind' mockery of the monks for their inconsistency when compared to Eunapius. (30) Cameron also places the epigram in the context of the plight of pagans after the Theodosian legislation, considers the epigram as 'one of the neatest of all his epigrams', and emphasises the irony in the practice of the Christian ascetics 'who flocked to the desert in their thousands [and] called themselves of all things solitaries' (31) He further remarks that Palladas' irony would have amused his friends, but probably have been 'safely lost on the ignorant monks of Alexandria'.
While their polytheist opponents, such as Libanius and Eunapius, viewed the monks' behavior as beastly, their admirers celebrated their attacks on Jews, "pagans," and "heretics." The permeability of communal boundaries in practice only enhanced the imaginative appeal of stories about the temple-bashing monks of Syria and Egypt.
Philostratus and Eunapius: The Lives of the Sophists, London.
Two freshwater sponge species, Eunapius fragilis and Spongilla aspinosa, were also found.
Even so, some occur in the large subterranean rivers of the karst in the Dinaric Alps in the Balkans, such as Marifugia cavatica (a serpulid polychaete), the sponge Eunapius subterraneus, and the dreissenid bivalve Congeria kusceri.
This we see most clearly among the Platonists, in Porphyry's biography of Plotinus and in Eunapius's lives of Iamblichus and his followers." Also see 190: "One of the reasons for this late antique obsession with the holy man was the wide acceptance of the Pythagorean view of philosophy as a religion and a way of life as much as an intellectual system .
(iv) A pagan historian of the early 6th-century, Zosimus, probably working at Constantinople, did little more than abbreviate the work of a late 4th-century pagan historian, Eunapius, and reported that (HN 2.29.2):(10)
See Eunapius 6.2; Lippold, `Sopatros' RE 3.a.1.1002-3; F.
The founder of Neoplatonism is said by his biographer Eunapius to have come from an Egyptian town called Lyco;(9) but as Eunapius notes with pride, the first life of Plotinus, written by Porphyry, says that the latter told his pupils nothing about his place of origin.(10) The location of the town was uncertain even in antiquity,(11) and it is possible that the use of the epithet 'Lycian' here by Henry More was not so much an error as a wilful mystification on the part of one who believed that the great philosopher had liked to make a riddle of his birth.