Eunomius

Eunomius

(yo͞onō`mēəs), c.A.D. 333–A.D. 393?, bishop of Cyzicus (c.361), founder of the Eunomian heresy. He was a disciple and secretary of AetiusAetius
, d. 367, Syrian theologian. He became prominent (c.350) as an exponent of the extreme Arianism developed mainly by his secretary Eunomius. Members of his party were called Aetians and Anomoeans.
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 whose extreme ArianismArianism
, Christian heresy founded by Arius in the 4th cent. It was one of the most widespread and divisive heresies in the history of Christianity. As a priest in Alexandria, Arius taught (c.
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 he adopted. His followers were called Eunomians or Anomoeans [Gr.,=unlike], from their denial of any substantial similarity between God the Father and God the Son. Using Platonic arguments, Eunomius taught that by definition God was unbegotten and that the Son, begotten of the Father, could not therefore be equal to the Father. His learning and sophistication won many admirers. St. Basil the Great refuted him in his doctrinal work Against Eunomius (364). The Eunomians were condemned at the First Council of Constantinople.
References in periodicals archive ?
Basil of Cesarea and his Attention to Relation ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) in the Trinitarian Debate with Eunomius
The themes of the colloquium were Gregory's (ca 335-394) third treatise against Eunomius and Trinitarian theology.
The facts presented by Eunomius explained the manner in which the Roman State Church was founded in the 4th century, and how its God Jesus Christ was invented
Gary Anderson, for example, uses the mosaic at Sepphoris to broaden interpretations of Genesis 22; Eric Daryl Meyer recalls Gregory of Nyssa and Eunomius of Cyzicus's interpretations of the naming of God's creatures in Genesis 2; Matthew Drever, Karla Pollman, and Ellen Charry take seriously Augustine's insights in Genesis 2-3; 3:18; 12:1-3; and 25:22-23.
Apart from some mild ad hominem attacks (which remind one of the patristic gems exemplified by Gregory of Nyssa's spat with Eunomius in the late fourth century), Hart wants to assess the logical and hermeneutical consistency of different writers, ranging from popular essayists such as Christopher Hitchens to the more systematic minds of Richard Dawkins and Daniel Dennett.
Did Eunomius and Gregory of Nyssa have the same God?
His heroes instead were Aetius and Eunomius, who had promoted the doctrine that the Father and the Son in the Trinity were "dissimilar.
One group, known as the Eunomians after their most gifted exponent, Eunomius, were brilliant in their dissection of each concept in support of their claim that Father and Son were actually 'unlike' each other, while on the other side Athanasius, a truculent but determined bishop of Alexandria, not only revived the Nicene formula and but also argued that the Holy Spirit must be placed alongside Father and Son (as had not been done at Nicaea).
Scholars have long recognized that the theological arguments of Basil of Caesarea, Gregory of Nazianzus, and Gregory of Nyssa against their opponent Eunomius helped to shape the development of Christian orthodoxy, and thus Christian self-definition, in the late fourth-century Roman Empire.
auch, dass Eunomius, der Schuler des Arius, bei dem der entsprechende Gedankengang voll ausgebildet ist, durch cine Reihe von Forschern eindeutig in die neuplatonische Tradition eingereiht werden konnte>> (cfr.
In Christian authors as well as in Eunomius the term has different shades of meaning.
One may, for instance, compare the teaching of St Athanasius and Arianism (since the former was engaged in polemics with the latter); the theological systems of Eunomius and Gregory of Nyssa (since Gregory refuted Eunomius); the viewpoints of Gregory the Theologian and Julian the Apostate (since they were contemporaries, knew each other, and Gregory wrote denunciatory letters against Julian); Manichaeism and the theology of Blessed Augustine (since Augustine was a Manichaean before his conversion to Christianity); the theology of St John of Damascus and Islam (since St John was engaged in polemics with Islam), and so on.