Eunomius

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Eunomius

(yo͞onō`mēəs), c.A.D. 333–A.D. 393?, bishop of Cyzicus (c.361), founder of the Eunomian heresy. He was a disciple and secretary of AetiusAetius
, d. 367, Syrian theologian. He became prominent (c.350) as an exponent of the extreme Arianism developed mainly by his secretary Eunomius. Members of his party were called Aetians and Anomoeans.
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 whose extreme ArianismArianism
, Christian heresy founded by Arius in the 4th cent. It was one of the most widespread and divisive heresies in the history of Christianity. As a priest in Alexandria, Arius taught (c.
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 he adopted. His followers were called Eunomians or Anomoeans [Gr.,=unlike], from their denial of any substantial similarity between God the Father and God the Son. Using Platonic arguments, Eunomius taught that by definition God was unbegotten and that the Son, begotten of the Father, could not therefore be equal to the Father. His learning and sophistication won many admirers. St. Basil the Great refuted him in his doctrinal work Against Eunomius (364). The Eunomians were condemned at the First Council of Constantinople.
References in periodicals archive ?
Basil of Caesarea, his classmate Gregory of Nazianzus, Basil's younger brother Gregory of Nyssa, and Aetius's student Eunomius of Cyzicus, whom pro-Nicene leaders accused of dangerously adapting the (already "heretical") teachings of Arius, all came from Cappadocia and gained ecclesiastical authority in the later fourth century.
In 362 Leontius and Theodulus participated in a small synod at Constantinople, attended also by the Neo-Arians Eunomius of Cyzicus and Theophilus the Indian, at which the Neo-Arian Aetius was consecrated bishop.
Basil of Caesarea had access to a theory of naming that emphasized their natural quality, and like their Latin Pro-Nicene counterparts, Basil and his Cappadocian allies move to a relational view of the names, in large part because of polemical pressure brought against them by their anti-Nicene opponents, primarily Eunomius of Cyzicus.
Catholic University of America Press, 2001), 173-219; and Richard Paul Vaggione, Eunomius of Cyzicus and the Nicene Revolution (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000).
He commendably presents the ways Basil of Caesarea and Gregory of Nyssa, as they propagated their doctrine on divine simplicity, met the challenge of Aetius and Eunomius of Cyzicus.
There is another fourth-century argument over God's fatherhood which seems the more likely foundation for Cappadocian trinitarian theology, namely the debate between Basil of Ancyra and George of Laodicea, who favored fatherson language, and Eunomius of Cyzicus and Eudoxius of Antioch, who favored Creator-creature language.