euonymus

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euonymus

(yo͞oŏn`ĭməs): see staff treestaff tree,
common name for some temperate members of the Celastraceae, a family of trees and shrubs (many of them climbing forms), widely distributed except in polar regions.
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References in periodicals archive ?
It feeds on euonymous plants - evergreen shrubs known as spindle trees in the UK.
Native species offer attractive, often beautiful flowers such as the racemes of clethera and itea, the subtle perfume of Calycanthus, and the unique flowers of Callicarpa and Euonymous.
Aesthetics: The 16,000 genista and euonymous plants on the north berm are a huge improvement over the tattered ivy and fill-in grass of years past.
Hebes, berberis, euonymous and pieris fit the bill perfectly.
For something daring and different, dense rosettes of ornamental cabbage which produce beautiful pink foliage look wonderful in a low-level basket, coupled with ivy and euonymous or simply left on their own.
30 -- Planted shrub, including Juniper, Eleagnus, Barberry, Euonymous, Abelia, Blue Holly, etc.
Privet hedges, Sweetfern, some Euonymous, Siberian Peashrub, Tamarix and numerous other shrubs should be checked out.
The numbers of armored and soft scales, including the euonymous scale, (Unaspis euonymi (Comstock)), were generally elevated during 2005.
Here are a few ideas to brighten up your garden at this time of year: Pyracantha 'Orange Glow' - evergreen shrub with bright orange berries; euphorbia myrsinites - low growing evergreen perennial; yellowy green flowerheads from late winter to spring; euonymous europaeus (Spindle tree) - native shrub/ small tree; pink lobed fruit which split open to show bright orange seeds.
My hair like a red barn stenciled in gray, the artifact of euonymous, I keep on with muscle that's survived, thankful for fieldstones heaved by border frost, monuments to record an apple orchard gone to wood.
Along came the euonymous bushes, the so-called spindle trees that were not trees at all but large-, medium- and dwarf-size shrubs.