Euphrosyne


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Euphrosyne

(yo͞ofrŏs`ənē'): see GracesGraces,
in Greek mythology, personifications of beauty, charm, and grace; daughters of Zeus and the oceanid Eurynome. Also known as the Charites, they were usually three in number and were called Aglaia, Thalia, and Euphrosyne.
..... Click the link for more information.
.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Euphrosyne

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Euphrosyne, asteroid 31 (the 31st asteroid to be discovered, on September 1, 1854), is approximately 270 kilometers in diameter and has an orbital period of 5.5 years. Euphrosyne, whose appellation means cheerfulness or joy, was named after one of the three Graces (the other two are Thalia and Aglaja). Euphrosyne was a daughter of Zeus and Eurynome. Like its mythological namesake, the asteroid confers the “grace” of joy to natives in whose chart it is prominent.

Sources:

Kowal, Charles T. Asteroids: Their Nature and Utilization. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Ellis Horwood Limited, 1988.
Room, Adrian. Dictionary of Astronomical Names. London: Routledge, 1988.
Schwartz, Jacob. Asteroid Name Encyclopedia. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1995.
The Astrology Book, Second Edition © 2003 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

Euphrosyne

[yü′fräz·ən·ē]
(astronomy)
An asteroid with a diameter of about 154 miles (248 kilometers), mean distance from the sun of 3.15 astronomical units, and B-type (C-like) surface composition.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Euphrosyne

one of the Graces; epitome of beauty in joy. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 481]
See: Beauty

Euphrosyne

one of Graces; name means ‘festivity.’ [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 96]
See: Joy
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
(5) The Voyage Out's Clarissa Dalloway echoes this sentiment from the decks of the Euphrosyne: "One thinks of all we've done, and our navies, and the people in India and Africa, and how we've gone on century after century, sending out boys from little country villages...it makes one feel as if one couldn't bear not to be English" (42).
'The educational effect of catechetical instruction in the fourth century A.D.', Euphrosyne 7 (1972) 249-271.
Miletus Michael Wildman Ismene Tracy Ifeachor Aglaea Aicha Kossoko Euphrosyne Pamela Nomvete Thalia Joy Richardson Haemon Simon Manyonda Tiresias Bruce Myers Antigone Vinette Robinson Talthybia Jacqueline Defferary Phaex Ferdinand Kingsley With: Jessie Burton, Daniel Fine, Karlina Grace, Irma Inniss, Alexia Khadime, Cornelius Macarthy, Clare Perkins, Victor Power, Daniel Poyser, Zara Tempest Waiters.
The trek up the mountain elicits a commentary that recalls the earlier vision aboard the Euphrosyne: "Higher and higher they went, becoming separated from the world.
The author, an enterprising scientific instrument maker called Benjamin Martin, revamped the Greek mode of teaching through dialogue by setting up imaginary conversations between two fictional characters: Euphrosyne, thirsty for knowledge, and her brother Cleonicus, who comes back home from university and expounds to his sister (rather condescendingly) on all the exciting subjects he has studied--optics, electricity, astronomy--while she has been consigned to spending her days singing, dancing and sewing.
Knight's rendition of Phrosyne's death might well have inspired the various descriptions of female encirclement--both in terms of fabrics and of bodies--that surround Euphrosyne, a beautiful woman in the anonymously published novel of Thomas Hope, Anastasius; or, Memoirs of a Modern Greek (1819), which Murray published and Byron admired.
Rowland ("Melville Answers" 9) notes that the image of the congregation's "sprightly nods and becks" is borrowed from lines 25-30 of Milton's L'Allegro in which the poet invokes the spirit of mirth, Euphrosyne, who is one of the Three Graces.
number of the versions of the Life of the transvestite Saint Euphrosyne
Another example, from mid-eighth-century Byzantine Italy, is Euphrosyne, deaconess and abbess of the women's monastery of SS.