Eupolis


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Eupolis

(yo͞o`pəlĭs), fl. 430–411 B.C., Athenian comic poet. He seems to have collaborated with Aristophanes, whom he also attacked; another of his victims was Alcibiades. His plays, satirical and malicious, were greatly admired by the ancients. Fragments of his work survive.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Ok so gossip is evil, but did you know that Socrates was severely lampooned not just by Aristophanes in his comedic play The Clouds but also by comic poets Callias, Eupolis, Telecleid, Mnesimachus, and Ameipsias and it wasn't because of anything serious like his philosophy but because he was untidy and unkempt, even ugly?
The focus on the eroticism of the piper can be found in the self-contradictory sense of the non-instrumentalist female piper (see Eupolis 184 K-A).
Shortly after the end of the classical period there grew up a confusion with regard to the etymological origins of the Latin word satura or "satire." It was, in fact, widely assumed that it was derived from the Greek word satyr, which named both the lusty half-man and half-goat creatures of mythological fame and the dramatic genre which featured them (traces of this confusion show up early in the tradition and may even begin to be visible in Horace's genealogy of satire at the beginning of 1.4 in which Lucilius is named as a descendant of the early Greek comic poets Aristophanes, Cratinus, and Eupolis).
Eupolis atque Cratinus Aristophanesque poetae atque alii quorum eomoedia prisea virorum est, si quis erat dignus deseribi quod malus ae fur, quod moeehus foret aut siearius aut alioqui famosus, multa eum libertate notabant.
(82) Eupolis in his [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] K-A 107, (83) pictured the politician and dithyramb poet Cinesias being followed by two trees:
(13) Plutarco la ejemplifica en este lugar citando unos versos del comediografo Eupolis (c.