Eurydice

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Eurydice

(yo͞orĭd`ĭsē): see OrpheusOrpheus
, in Greek mythology, celebrated Thracian musician. He was the son of Calliope by Apollo or, according to another legend, by Oeagrus, a king of Thrace. Supposedly, the music of his lyre was so beautiful that when he played, wild beasts were soothed, trees danced, and
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Eurydice

doomed to eternal death when Orpheus disobeys Hades. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 97]

Eurydice

transformed into a bacchante to suit enamored Zeus. [Fr. Operetta: Offenbach, Orpheus in Hades, Westerman, 271–272]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
stressed-syllable [[epsilon]:u] euro, feudo, neutro, diphthong pseudo stressed-syllable iato [eu[??]] beuta, Meucci, reuccio, Seul unstressed-syllable [eu] euforico, Europa, iato Eumenidi, feudale, leucemia Strictly, "Euridice" belongs to none of these.
Si Orfeo representa la tarea del dia, Euridice es el fragil y sombrio destello de la potencia nocturna, de la que el canto debe apoderarse para que la obra exista.
Talent stifled, Euridice turns her hand to a number of creative endeavours - from cooking to dress making - in an attempt to channel her creativity and brighten up her daily routine.
Euridice, on the other hand, attempts to be the good daughter in her family, marrying a man she feels less than thrilled about for security and respectability.
Gluck composed Orfeo ed Euridice in 1762, abandoning traditional conventions and amazing his audiences with realistic, true-to-life situations making them believable through accessible music and words.
The simple floor slab memorializing Jacopo Peri [1561-1633] reads "Creator of opera (melodramma)." Historians of music have long known the Florentine Peri for his groundbreaking, between-act musical spectacles, or intermedii, and for the Medici/Lorraine wedding of 1589 and his subsequent Dafne and Euridice, which were arguably the first operas.
Musical annotator Howard Posner, writing for the Los Angeles Philharmonic and referring to the second movement, said, "The resemblance between this movement and the scene in (Christoph) Gluck's opera 'Orfeo ed Euridice' - in which Orpheus calms the Furies with his song so that they let him enter Hades (and bring his beloved Euridice back to the world), has been much remarked on, notably by (Franz) Liszt."