Eurocentric

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Eurocentric

chiefly concerned with or concentrating on Europe and European culture
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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to an end." (38) The "critical-negative aspect" of African philosophy, or the critique of Eurocentrism, is the theoretic consummation of this ending.
But Dainotto insists on identifying Europe and the emergence of Eurocentrism not by setting Europe against something non-Europe, i.e., Asia in particular only--"It would be against the logic of Eurocentrism, in fact, to form a sense of European identity by making recourse to Asia or anything outside Europe.
(5) This is an obstacle that Ella Shohat and Robert Stam point out in their introduction (6) and to which their Unthinking Eurocentrism goes a long way in overcoming through their polycentric-multicultural approach.
The final essay grapples with the low estimation of Brazilian culture among Brazilian writers themselves, envisaged a century ago in the Eurocentrism of Joaquim Nabuco, and the current struggle for cultural identity in a world threatened by globalization and the electronic media.
So while it does seem elites could do much with their patriotic epistemologies (such as rejecting Eurocentrism) they also excluded, as Canizares-Esguerra notes, almost all contemporary mestizos and Amerindians (while only lionizing those of the noble past).
Even Soyinka who has to date been the troika's most strident critic has been constrained to acknowledge the sheer importance of their quest for "racial self-retrieval." Up until this text was published in 1980, there was virtually no sustained study of Eurocentrism in the reading of African literature, a task whose importance cannot easily be gainsaid.
It adequately portrays the complexity of these various issues, with equal measures of explanation of indigenous traditions and culture, of critique of Eurocentrism, and of calls for reform.
While Eurocentrism assumes an unwarranted priority for Europe culturally, and gives it a continental parity with Asia or Africa, Afrocentric (and, one might also argue, Asiacentric) views simply reproduce this chauvinism in an inverted form.
For reflections on mathematics education and culture, I also recommend Ethnomathematics: Challenging Eurocentrism in Mathematics Education (Powell and Frankenstein 1997).
David Brooks's clever Bobos in Paradise (2000), for instance, loses much of its edge when the cultural innovation it claims to identify -- the effortless merging of bourgeois and bohemian values by post-baby boomers -- turns up under Trilling's lens in the classic 1961 essay "On the Teaching of Modern Literature." In 1952, decades before Eurocentrism became a fighting word, Trilling seeks to analyze where artists and intellectuals should look "now that they can't depend on Europe as a cultural example." Matters nowadays too polarized for rational discussion yield to the "strenuous" reading and rigorous analysis that, for Trilling, represented the moral response to literature and to life.
In this process of educational change, ivory towers have been transformed into expensive trade schools; Eurocentrism has been upended; teaching and research are now "politicized and treated as instruments of popular reform" (xv).
More disturbing, perhaps, is a certain Eurocentrism that runs through the book.