starling

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starling,

any of a group of originally Old World birds that have become distributed worldwide. Starlings were released in New York City in 1890; since then the common, or European, starling (Sturnus vulgaris) has spread throughout North America. They often collect in loud, noisy flocks. Starlings destroy some insects, but they are generally considered a nuisance and an agricultural pest because they drive away smaller, desirable birds and damage fruit trees and other crops. They have iridescent, blackish plumage and a long bill which is yellow in spring and summer. They mimic bird songs and other sounds. Starlings are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Passeriformes, family Sturnidae.
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starling

[′stär·liŋ]
(civil engineering)
A protective enclosure around the pier of a bridge that consists of piles driven close together and is often filled with gravel or stone to protect the pier by serving as a break to water, ice, or drift.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

starling

1
any gregarious passerine songbird of the Old World family Sturnidae, esp Sturnus vulgaris, which has a blackish plumage and a short tail

starling

2
an arrangement of piles that surround a pier of a bridge to protect it from debris, etc.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The ureter in the Japanese quail was composed of tunica mucosa, submucosa, muscularis and serosa as reported for the European starling (Williams & Nicholson) and pigeon (Abdul-Gahaffor et al.).
The European Starling (.Sturnus vulgaris) has been considered a competitive threat to cavity-nesting birds in the United States, as well as a pest species and hazard to aviation safety (Feare 1984; Ingold 1994; Dolbeer et al.
Song as an honest signals of past developmental stress in the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris).
Components of variance in measurements of nestling European Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) in southeastern Pennsylvania.
We compare species having different development periods: the altricial European starling, which exhibits rapid growth, and two species of precocial quail, which grow more slowly.
The study showed that the smallest chicks in European starling families changed their adult feeding behaviour, resulting in a fatter body composition in the fully developed birds.
Hepatic iron accumulation over time in European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) fed two levels of iron.
European starlings were Introduced (released on purpose) in New York City's Central Park in 1890 by fans of William Shakespeare who wanted to bring in each kind of bird mentioned in his writings.
House sparrows, European starlings, and Carneux pigeons were inoculated with 4 influenza A (H5N1) viruses isolated from different avian species.
Researchers gave European starlings a dose of 10% alcohol and found it was completely metabolized within two hours.
We questioned whether an avoidance response to sulfur and sulfur-based products might be exhibited by other avian species, specifically European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris L.) and whether the behavior might extend beyond the feeding context (that is, negatively affecting nesting).
Ornithologists have reported that some birds, such as European starlings, tuck aromatic leaves with pest-fighting properties into old nests.

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