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Electronics an electrical circuit with an output that is a well-defined fraction of the given input
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

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[də′vīd·ər]
(design engineering)
A tool like a compass, used in metalworking to lay out circles or arcs and to space holes or other dimensions.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In some cases European terms are used rather than their North American equivalents (epicarp vs exocarp).
The external coordinates of the European integration, which functioned so well under the Cold War, although then with Europe defined in West European terms, have shifted and been fundamentally displaced by globalisation and the new global conflicts.
'That's down to experience as much as anything and people forget we are a still a young side in European terms.'
Although not enormous in European terms, this is a rise of some 5 million [euro] on 2004, which, in turn, had risen 5 million [euro] on 2003.
Howell is now the world's top-ranked Briton in 13th place and only Sergio Garcia is above him in European terms.
The UK is known for being a large market for paper and board products in European terms. The country boasts a comparatively healthy consumption of well over 12 million metric tons of paper and board per annum, but this year it seems that papermakers are almost more concerned with events in the energy market than their own field.
"We'll only be 31 and, in European terms, that's not too old at all and there's no reason why we can't be even better when it comes there if everything goes smoothly in the next couple of years."
The control of a significant block of airspace such as NOTA by the IAA will be significant in European terms. The new agreement between UK NATS and the IAA sets the basis for a variety of co-operative structures and relationships when the EU Regulations are introduced at the end of this year.
The reason is that, although big in European terms, the Murano doesn't look too big on the road.
The less interesting elements of King's discussion reflect the old paradox much discussed by James devotees: How could a native Trinidadian, jet-black at that, regional nationalist when young, key activist of Pan-Africanism during the 1930s-40s, and ardent supporter of Black Power in old age, define himself, his intellectual life and tastes, so often in European terms, from Shakespeare to cricket?
An example: Germany is a huge market in European terms (39 million TV homes).
For all its positive contributions, it also ended up sanctioning modernity's power struggles, the quest for globalization and unity (on European terms, of course).

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