Eurydice


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Related to Eurydice: Orpheus and Eurydice

Eurydice

(yo͞orĭd`ĭsē): see OrpheusOrpheus
, in Greek mythology, celebrated Thracian musician. He was the son of Calliope by Apollo or, according to another legend, by Oeagrus, a king of Thrace. Supposedly, the music of his lyre was so beautiful that when he played, wild beasts were soothed, trees danced, and
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Eurydice

doomed to eternal death when Orpheus disobeys Hades. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 97]

Eurydice

transformed into a bacchante to suit enamored Zeus. [Fr. Operetta: Offenbach, Orpheus in Hades, Westerman, 271–272]
References in periodicals archive ?
And as his head, cut off from his beautiful neck, Was tumbling down the rushing course of Hebrus, His voice and tongue, with his last breath, cried out, 'Eurydice! O poor Eurydice!' And the banks of the downward river echoed: 'Eurydice!" (22) In the context of Purg.
So persuasive was he that Hades allows Eurydice to return to the world of the living, on one condition: Orpheus must not look back while his wife is still in the dark.
The champion of all afterlife productions is the story of Orpheus and Eurydice, with over thirty different productions of theatre, opera, dance, and film listed on Wikipedia.
Eurydice died on their wedding day and Orpheus, a famed musician, played the saddest song ever heard he was urged to go to the Underworld to try and rescue her.
Suddenly, after months or years of longing, we decide to get Eurydice
Also encouraging was the variety across the three programs the company had chosen to dance: a triple-bill of works by 20th century French choreographers, the romantic full-length ballet Giselle, and Pina Bausch's 1975 version of the opera Orpheus and Eurydice. My expectations were high.
Whether Orpheus ever lived other than in Greek mythology, his fame as a musician, a poet, a prophet, and the man who tried to bring his wife Eurydice back from Hades has flourished through European civilisation's love of Classical mythology long after other gods and goddesses have passed their sell-by date.
As an adolescent, Salagnon fought with the maquis during World War II, where he met Eurydice, a nurse who arrives with North African troops during the liberation of France.
H.D.'s 1916 poem, "Eurydice," which follows a discursive pattern from personal disempowerment to autonomous survival.
On her wedding day to Orpheus, Eurydice trips and falls into the depths of the underworld where her memories are washed away by the river Styx.