event-related potential

(redirected from Event-related potentials)
Also found in: Medical.

event-related potential

[i¦vent ri‚lād·əd pə′ten·chəl]
(neuroscience)
Electrical activity produced by the brain in response to a sensory stimulus or associated with the execution of a motor, cognitive, or psychophysiologic task.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The effect of heavy social drinking on recall and event-related potentials.
Event-related potentials give us the knowledge about cortical physiological processes during information processing.
An event-related potentials study of face identification and naming: The tip-of-the-tongue state.
The results from event-related potentials are also more supportive for the two-stage parallel model than for the serial or other parallel models, as reflected in the differential waves associated to correct and wrong combinations.
In [14] the effects of electromagnetic fields, emitted by GSM mobile phones on human EEG event-related potentials and performance during an auditory task with 12 subjects were investigated.
In 1990, Paige and colleagues published a seminal study applying event-related potential (ERP) methodology to the investigation of central nervous system function in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) [1].
The use of event-related potentials (ERPs) to assess the early impact of such exposure offers a way to test infants shortly after birth.
Simultaneous recording of event-related potentials from the anterior cingulate cortex demonstrated less of an error-related negativity (ERN) in psychopaths, but only on the task requiring emotional identification, reported Ms.
Applications of brain event-related potentials to problems in engineering psychology.
In one study high-density event-related potentials were recorded from the brains of 4- to 5-year-olds who were divided into three groups: children with autistic spectrum disorder, those with developmental delay and those with normal development.
Techniques such as electroencephalography (EEG), event-related potentials (ERP), and brainstem-evoked response (BSER) all share a common approach to cortical electrophysiology -- scalp electrodes are used to detect electrical activity generated by the brain.
A variation of the Sternberg memory-scanning task was used in which event-related potentials were recorded to both the memory set and the probe.