selection pressure

(redirected from Evolutionary pressure)
Also found in: Medical, Wikipedia.

selection pressure

[si′lek·shən ‚presh·ər]
(evolution)
Those factors that influence the direction of natural selection.
References in periodicals archive ?
"We wonder if a greater wood smoke exposure has led to evolutionary pressure on women to have a more blunted inflammatory response, which would probably result in less damage to the airway during respiratory virus infection," Jaspers said.
"Our hypothesis was that if total length and travel distance were important evolutionary criteria for plants, there would be evolutionary pressure to minimize the criteria together, and that's actually what we found," explains Ullas Pedmale, who was a postdoctoral researcher on the project and now is an assistant professor at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory.
Analysis shows that those eggshells still "contain minor amounts of eggshell pigment." That lingering amount suggests that evolution gradually reduced the pigment in their eggs because their brooding over their eggs reduced evolutionary pressure on egg-coloring genes.
The geographical heterogeneity exerts evolutionary pressure to a specie to adopt the status of an ecocline to that extent which evolves it into sub-species (Groombridge et al., 2004).
Eons of attacks from wasps might have been an evolutionary pressure favoring such sensitivity, Hoy says.
Even while the evolutionary pressure of nationalist and populist politics can cloud the landscape, the reality is that the future of higher education requires making internationalization a priority.
Siebeck), sought to determine whether a species of fish, unlikely to have experienced any evolutionary pressure for human facial recognition, could learn to discriminate human faces.
Consider the following simple example Shermer and others offer to make the case for the evolutionary pressure to discern patterns.
"No evolutionary pressure on root vegetables to look pretty, so they don't." Hugh Laurie.
"No evolutionary pressure on root vegetables to look pretty, so they don't" - Actor and TV presenter Hugh Laurie.
a son-in-law; how parents grant access to their daughters' reproductive capacity only to men with specific traits, creating evolutionary pressure on men to signal these qualities; and how Western postindustrial societies differ when parents do not have a choice.
This may be because owners are more responsible and do not let their dogs run free or because there actually has been evolutionary pressure. The dogs who chased cars were hit by cars and did not live to pass on the car-chasing gene.

Full browser ?