joule

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joule

(jo͞ol, joul), abbr. J, unit of workwork,
in physics and mechanics, transfer of energy by a force acting to displace a body. Work is equal to the product of the force and the distance through which it produces movement.
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 or energyenergy,
in physics, the ability or capacity to do work or to produce change. Forms of energy include heat, light, sound, electricity, and chemical energy. Energy and work are measured in the same units—foot-pounds, joules, ergs, or some other, depending on the system of
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 in the mks systemmks system,
system of units of measurement based on the metric system and having the meter of length, the kilogram of mass, and the second of time as its fundamental units. Other mks units include the newton of force, the joule of work or energy, and the watt of power.
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 of units, which is based on the metric systemmetric system,
system of weights and measures planned in France and adopted there in 1799; it has since been adopted by most of the technologically developed countries of the world.
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; it is the work done or energy expended by a force of 1 newton acting through a distance of 1 meter. The joule is named for James P. Joule.

joule

(jool) Symbol: J. The SI unit of energy, equal to the work done when the point of application of a force of one newton is moved one meter in the direction of the force.

Joule

 

a unit of energy and work in the International System of Units and the MKSA (meter-kilogram-second-ampere) system. It is equal to the work done by a force of 1 newton in moving a body 1 m in the direction of the force. It is named in honor of the English physicist J. Joule. In Russian the symbol is dzh; the international symbol is J.

At the Second World Conference of Electrical Engineers (1889) the joule was introduced into the absolute practical electrical units as the unit of work and energy for electric current. The joule was defined as the work done at a power of 1 watt in 1 second. The International Conference on Electrical Units and Standards (London, 1908) established “international” electrical units, among them the so-called international joule. After the return to absolute electrical units (beginning Jan. 1, 1948), the ratio of 1 international joule to 1.00020 absolute joules was adopted.

The joule is also used as a unit of quantity of heat. The ratio of the joule to other units is as follows: 1 joule = 107 ergs = 0.2388 calories.

G. D. BURDUN

joule

[jül or jau̇l]
(mechanics)
The unit of energy or work in the meter-kilogram-second system of units, equal to the work done by a force of 1 newton magnitude when the point at which the force is applied is displaced 1 meter in the direction of the force. Symbolized J. Also known as newton-meter of energy.

joule

A unit of energy or work; equals the work done by a force of 1 newton which acts over a distance of 1 metre in the direction of the force.

joule

the derived SI unit of work or energy; the work done when the point of application of a force of 1 newton is displaced through a distance of 1 metre in the direction of the force. 1 joule is equivalent to 1 watt-second, 107 ergs, 0.2390 calories, or 0.738 foot-pound

Joule

James Prescott. 1818--89, English physicist, who evaluated the mechanical equivalent of heat and contributed to the study of heat and electricity

joule

A unit of energy in the MKS system. It is equal to 10,000,000 ergs in the CGS system. Surge protectors are often given joule ratings, but this refers only to the amount of energy they can absorb, not what gets through. See CGS system.
References in periodicals archive ?
The residential sector consumed 0.35 exajoules (332 trillion BTUs) of energy from wood in 2004 (USDOE 2005).
Wright estimates that human activities tie up between 20 and 30 percent of the potentially available photosynthetically fixed energy in terrestrial ecosystems -- some 650 to 800 exajoules (1 exajoule = [10.sup.18] joules) annually.
CEM analysis shows that implementation of the ISO 50001 standard across the commercial and industrial sectors globally could drive cumulative energy savings of approximately 62 exajoules by 2030, sparing nearly USD 600 billion in energy costs and avoiding 6 500 million metric tonnes of CO2 emissions.
The first step was to take the commonly estimated 2050 world energy demand we seem to be heading for, which is 1000 Exajoules per annum, or 28 billion kilowatt-hours, twice the present figure.
The most optimistic scenario projects renewable energy to account for about 314 Exajoules per year by 2050, or more than three times the annual energy supply in the USA in 2005, and also a similar level of supply on the European continent, according to government and independent sources.
At that rate, 84 minutes of solar radiation falling on our planet's surface is equal to the world's estimated annual energy consumption of 900 exajoules. After an introduction to renewables in general and solar technologies in particular, he talks about tracking the sun by taking into account differences in the Earth's rotational velocity and seasonal changes in the sun's apparent elevation.
According to estimates by USGS scientists, the total Russian resource is close to 5,000 exajoules - enough to meet current world demand for 60 years.
The report identifies nearly 10 exajoules the equivalent of more than 341 megatonnes of coal of options for sustainable development through renewable energy.
For instance, projections for gas in 2050 range from 20 to 160 exajoules, with a median of 56 exajoules, Schock said.