exchange theory

exchange theory

a theoretical perspective based on SIMMELs insight that ‘all contacts among men rest on the schema of giving and returning the equivalence (BLAU, 1964). The approach also draws upon economics and behavioural psychology, viewing individuals as always seeking to maximize rewards from their interactions with others (see also HOMANS). As a mode of analysis, exchange theory is associated with interesting hypotheses about social behaviour, e.g. Blau's suggestion that people tend to marry partners able to offer equivalent social assets. Critics of the approach, however, regard it as providing a model which is, at best, capable of presenting only a partial account of human social relations. Limitations of the approach suggested are: its tautological assumptions that social relations always involve exchange relations; its failure to deal adequately with such phenomena as traditional action or general values, and the great variety of human emotions. see also RATIONAL CHOICE THEORY.
References in periodicals archive ?
He employs central place foraging and exchange theory, subsets of human behavioral ecology, to interpret the large data set.
Social exchange theory provides a theoretical basis for the relationship between LMX and POS to be understood, and it also explains the effect of these two aspects of the exchange relationship on employees' attitudes and behaviors (Blau, 1964).
Past studies have treated the Leader-Member Exchange Theory as a construct that measures the quality of the exchange relationship between a supervisor and subordinate (Green & Cashman, 1975; Graen et al., 1982; Graen & Scandura, 1987).
Social exchange theory (Blau, 1964) is a robust organizational behavior paradigm (Cropanzano & Mitchell, 2005) to provide justifications for followers' supportiveness to change.
The theory of motivation which is adopted by this study is the Social Exchange Theory. The Social Exchange Theory was formally advanced in the works of sociologists George Homans and Peter Blau.
The second section covers 27 theories in 27 chapters, which are divided into six broad classifications: the self and messages (e.g., cognitive dissonance theory and symbolic interaction theory); relationship development (e.g., social exchange theory and relational dialectics theory); groups, teams, and organizations (e.g., groupthink and organizational culture theory); the public (e.g., the rhetoric and the narrative paradigm); the media (e.g., uses and gratifications theory and agenda setting theory); and culture and diversity (e.g., muted group theory and feminist standpoint theory).
About social exchange theory (Blau, 1964), employees invest energies at work to get a return on management in a fair manner (Macey and Schneider, 2008).
Cognitive economics is relevant to game theory and exchange economics, augmenting and alleviating the established view of game theory, that is planned bilateral interplays between indistinguishable participants in a non-institutional setting, and being instrumental in and adjusting the standard approach of exchange theory (Tang and Tang, 2014), restricted to economics, that is passive networks of products (Barnett, 2017) between specific participants moderated by the market.
Insights from social exchange theory will inform the investigation, A suitable framework for our purposes because it emphasizes the interplay between self-interest and interdependence.
Furthermore, with arguments based on social exchange theory (Blau, 1964) and reactance theory (Brehm, 1966), organizational deviance is argued to have higher effects than interpersonal deviance due to an organizations' structure being created and sustained by the organization itself in that it is an organizational factor.
However, in this study the antecedents of innovative work behavior are derived from social exchange theory (SET) which explicate that the employment relationship are maintained between the employees and their organization in order to gain mutual benefits (Blau, 1964 ).
According to Social Exchange Theory, job satisfaction can be inferred through the reciprocity between employee and the organization who he or she attached to.