inclusion-exclusion principle

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inclusion-exclusion principle

[¦in‚klü·zhən ′eks‚klü·zhən ‚prin·sə·pəl]
(mathematics)
The principle that, if A and B are finite sets, the number of elements in the union of A and B can be obtained by adding the number of elements in A to the number of elements in B, and then subtracting from this sum the number of elements in the intersection of A and B.
References in periodicals archive ?
El origen de las nociones exclusion-inclusion se remite a principios de los anos 70 cuando Rene Lenoir (1974) las popularizo al identificar en el grupo de excluidos a todos aquellos que, de acuerdo a su pensamiento, manifiestan una incapacidad para desempenarse en la dinamica social (en los terminos del autor, los minusvalidos fisicos y mentales, ancianos invalidos, "inadaptados sociales", entre otros).
Asi es como la vinculacion de la exclusion-inclusion con esta forma de interpretar la pobreza provee de los elementos clasicos de la accion social de "lucha contra la exclusion".
A brief history of the idea of social exclusion-inclusion
For example, in terms of policy frames it is important to acknowledge that the contemporary exclusion-inclusion dynamic around welfare-to-work and employment policies has a much longer history in the binary category of 'deserving' and 'undeserving poor'.
Readers are thus directed to discover the cultural richness of the multi-faceted Jewish minority in Italy, a minority that, even though marginalized, segregated and confined to a ghetto, was able to be included in the dominant generalized Catholic culture of the Italian Peninsula, all the way until this continuous connotation of social exclusion-inclusion reached its highest form of exclusion in the Fascist regime.
She claims a wider understanding of the exclusion-inclusion issue is needed--one that includes discrimination on the grounds of gender, ethnicity, disability, age, religion, sexuality, language, region, and class.