exhaust velocity


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exhaust velocity

[ig′zȯst və′läs·əd·ē]
(fluid mechanics)
The velocity of gaseous or other particles in the exhaust stream of the nozzle of a reaction engine, relative to the nozzle.
References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 9 displays the temperature contours; relative humidity contours at cooling towers exhaust velocity of 10 m/s (1,968 fpm).
Exhaust velocity may be obtained directly from the engine controller, or calculated using exhaust mass flow rate and temperature (to adjust for density variation) along with pipe area.
A turbocharger uses a radial in axial out turbine configuration which is influenced mainly by the exhaust velocity. Higher the velocity the better will be the spooling of the turbocharger.
Jet mixing noise is a strong characteristic of jet exhaust velocity. Consequently, noise reduction strategies are aimed at increasing the bypass ratio to lower nozzle exit velocities and designing bypass and core flows to improve mixing with each other and the atmosphere.
An NTR uses nuclear fission as an energy source instead of chemical combustion, and uses just hydrogen as a propellant, allowing it to achieve a very high exhaust velocity and high thrust, Discovery News reported.
There is thus almost no limit to the theoretical exhaust velocity of such technology and, in fact, exhaust velocities of 50,000 to 100,000 m/s--10 to 20 times those of chemical engines--have been demonstrated.
Wind velocity, direction, exhaust outlet location relative to air intakes and doors, exhaust velocity, and dilution at the exhaust outlet all influence possible re-ingestion.
The current Standard 62.1 Informative Appendix F method includes some of these factors but does not include variable wind speed, stack height, plume rise effect caused by exhaust velocity, or hidden intake reduction factors.
To explore the outer planets in a reasonable time, engines must generate either high exhaust velocity or high specific impulse.
This is important from a safety standpoint because user safety could be compromised due to insufficient exhaust velocity.
It may be noted that the plume rise as per ASHRAE 2007 (Equation 8) were functions of the exhaust velocity ratio [(V.sub.e] / [U.sub.H]) and stack diameter [(d.sub.e]) whilst the 2011 version also incorporates the effects of wind profile and stack-receptor distance (X).