Exhaust-only ventilation

Exhaust-only ventilation

Mechanical ventilation system in which one or more fans are used to exhaust air from a house, and makeup air is supplied passively. Exhaust-only ventilation creates slight depressurization of the home; its impact on vented gas appliances should be considered.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Exhaust-only ventilation leads to depressurization in houses, town houses and row houses constructed to meet the 2015 International Residential Code and significant depressurization in apartment construction that is constructed to meet the 2015 International Building Code.
In row houses and town houses, exhaust-only ventilation leads to air being pulled from neighboring units as well as from attached garages and from under slabs.
But the compartmentalization makes the pressure issue way worse when we use exhaust-only ventilation.
Exhaust-only ventilation no longer works in new single-family detached because we now codify "tight" and test for it.
The same issue, however, exists for exhaust-only ventilation systems.
Filtration cannot be sensibly added to an exhaust-only ventilation system unless one considers the building envelope as part of the filtration system.
"For $150 you can meet ASHRAE-62 air change recommendations by using a product like Panasonic's fan for exhaust-only ventilation," says Pettit.
A follow-up study was done on 18 homes to determine whether exhaust-only ventilation that met ANSI/ ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2010 had an impact in radon levels.
([dagger][dagger]) It is possible to make the garage more negative than the house even if it has an exhaust-only ventilation system.
That would be exhaust-only ventilation. It is not a very effective method of ventilation.
If you actually install an exhaust-only ventilation system operating at Standard 62.1 or Standard 62.2 rates in an apartment that is compartmentalized to the requirements of Standard 62.2 (or the LEED multifamily compartmentalization requirement if you want to be reasonable), you are going to be operating at a negative pressure for a standard-sized apartment (about 750 [ft.sup.2] [70 [m.sup.2]] and two bedrooms).
The Standard 62.1 and Standard 62.2 folks say that you are not required to use exhaust-only ventilation. You can use supply ventilation or balanced ventilation.