gravitational wave

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gravitational wave

[‚grav·ə′tā·shən·əl ′wāv]
(relativity)
A propagating gravitational field predicted by general relativity, which is produced by some change in the distribution of matter; it travels at the speed of light, exerting forces on masses in its path. Also known as gravitational radiation.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
As you might expect, this paper is of monumental historical importance: After a century of waiting, physicists have finally confirmed the existence of gravitational waves. In so doing, they've confirmed the last major prediction of Einstein's theory of general relativity and, they believe, offered a way forward for the study of black holes.
Albert Einstein predicted the existence of gravitational waves in his general theory of relativity a century ago, and scientists have been attempting to detect them for 50 years.
Einstein in 1916 proposed the existence of gravitational waves as an outgrowth of his ground-breaking general theory of relativity, which depicted gravity as a distortion of space and time triggered by the presence of matter.
Previously, two Princeton scientists won the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1993 for discovering a new type of pulsar that offered indirect proof of the existence of gravitational waves.
The existence of gravitational waves was put forth in theory 100 years ago by Albert Einstein.
Twenty years from now, LISA Pathfinder will be history, just like Einstein's doubts about the existence of gravitational waves, the fuss around Weber's claims of measuring the waves with his bar detectors, and, hopefully, the worrisome non-detections by pulsar timing arrays.
GLASGOW University professor Sheila Rowan is at the cutting edge of science, leading the hunt to prove the existence of gravitational waves.
The existence of gravitational waves was first demonstrated in the 1970s and 80s by Joseph Taylor, Jr., and colleagues.
The use of gravitational potential which is a dynamical parameter also signifies that the existence of gravitational waves can also be predicted using Newton's theory of gravitation.
The existence of gravitational waves was proven indirectly with observations of the first binary pulsar (PSR 1913+16), discovered by Joseph Taylor and Russell Hulse in 1974.
The existence of gravitational waves, described as ripples in the curvature of space-time, was postulated in Einstein's theory of relativity.