lipid pneumonia

(redirected from Exogenous lipoid pneumonia)
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lipid pneumonia

[′lip·əd nu̇′mō·nyə]
(medicine)
Pneumonia resulting from aspiration of oily substances, such as nose drops.
Deposition of lipids in tissues of chronically inflamed lungs. Also known as lipoid pneumonia.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In a time of evolving modes of tobacco delivery, such as vaping, new pulmonary manifestations of smoking are also being recognized, including exogenous lipoid pneumonia. (2)
In 1925, Laughlen [1] first described four cases of a rare form of pneumonia caused by inhalation of fatty substances and named it exogenous lipoid pneumonia (ELP).
Exogenous lipoid pneumonia (ELP): when radiologist makes the difference.
While these specific studies did not report any negative side effects of oil pulling, other peer-reviewed articles link oil pulling to exogenous lipoid pneumonia, which is a rare form of pneumonia that is caused when a person aspirates an oily substance (10).
Exogenous lipoid pneumonia due to nasal application of petroleum jelly.
Exogenous lipoid pneumonia (ELP) is a rare form of pneumonia caused by inhalation or aspiration of fatty substances.
Acute form of exogenous lipoid pneumonia caused by inhalation of liquid paraffin in a fire-eater.
A classic example is exogenous lipoid pneumonia, in which foamy macrophages with coarsely vacuolated cytoplasm accumulate within lung parenchyma.