exoplanet

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exoplanet

or

extrasolar planet,

a planet located outside the solar system. See planetplanet
[Gr.,=wanderer], a large nonluminous body of rock, gas, or ice that orbits the sun or another star, has a rounded shape due to gravity, and has cleared its orbit of smaller objects.
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; planetary systemplanetary system,
a star and all the celestial bodies bound to it by gravity, especially planets and their natural satellites. Until the last decade of the 20th cent., the only planetary system known was the solar system, which comprises the sun and the surrounding planets,
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.

exoplanet

[‚ek·sō′plan·ət]
(astronomy)
References in periodicals archive ?
Thanks largely to the pioneering Kepler space telescope, we also now know that small, rocky exoplanets are common and that planetary systems are astonishing in their diversity.
Out of 275 candidate planets, scientists confirmed 95 were exoplanets.
Of the 275 candidates in the dataset - being compiled since the first K2 data release in 2014 - 149 were verified to be actual exoplanets, and of those, researchers found 54 had already been discovered earlier, leaving them with 95 previously unknown exoplanets.
USA], Aug 15 ( ANI ): There's a possibility for a lot more exoplanets to be tidally locked, according to new research.
Washington: Astronomers using the Kepler space telescope have detected 219 possible new exoplanets in our galaxy, including 10 relatively small, rocky and possibly habitable planets similar to our own, Nasa announced on Monday.
Maybe, after the thousands of exoplanets already found, folks have become blase about exoplanets, even one that is so close.
The majority of exoplanets are found when they transit in front of their respective stars.
It will hopefully add to existing information about earth-like exoplanets and other information about far away exoplanets and systems.
This animated illustration shows one possible scenario for the rocky exoplanet 55 Cancri e, nearly two times the size of Earth.
One way of detecting exoplanets is to measure the dimming of star light caused by a transit.
It is likely, they believe, that life could have emerged, evolved, and flourished on at least some of the billions of exoplanets thought to dwell in the Milky Way alone--just as it did on our own planet.
In the light of recent events, where the possibility of buying the rights to name exoplanets has been advertised, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) wishes to inform the public that such schemes have no bearing on the official naming process.