exoskeleton

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Related to Exoskeletons: apodeme

exoskeleton

the protective or supporting structure covering the outside of the body of many animals, such as the thick cuticle of arthropods

Exoskeleton

The system of supports in a French Gothic church, including the ribbed vaults, flying buttresses, and pier buttresses. Also, the external structural skeleton of a building consisting of a framework of attached members, or a poured-in-place concrete framework.

exoskeleton

[¦ek·sō′skel·ə·tən]
(invertebrate zoology)
The external supportive covering of certain invertebrates, such as arthropods.
(vertebrate zoology)
Bony or horny epidermal derivatives, such as nails, hoofs, and scales.
References in periodicals archive ?
Neuroprostheses and exoskeletons that provide real-time feedback to the user, engage their user by harnessing the user's intent from his or her own neural signals, and provide assist-as-needed functionality may also enhance motor learning and therefore neurological rehabilitation (Venkatakrishnan, Francisco, and Contreras-Vidal 2014).
California-based company, suitX has launched its medical exoskeletons, dubbed Phoenix, for those with mobility disorders.
Indego is the second exoskeleton to receive FDA certification for U.S.
Also in the medical exoskeleton domain is the Phoenix exoskeleton designed by California based robotics company suitX, which designs and makes medical and industrial exoskeletons.
Testers were pleased that the exoskeleton let them lift heavy objects repeatedly without strain, but everyone also wanted it to move faster and be able to cope with heavier loads.
Daley, "A physiologist's perspective on robotic exoskeletons for human locomotion," International Journal of Humanoid Robotics, vol.
M2 PRESSWIRE-August 23, 2019-: Global Exoskeleton System Market Outlook 2019-2024: Projected to Rise at a CAGR of Approx 40%
The Sarcos Guardian XO Max is a full-body, all-electric exoskeleton that features strength amplification of up to 20 to 1, making 200 pounds-the suit's upper limit-feel like 10 pounds for the user.The suit transfers its own weight and the weight of the payload to the ground ratherthan to the user's back and limbs.
For the younger users, the technology can help increase stamina and help them accomplish more without the bulk of current robotic exoskeletons. Because Powered Clothing is made of softer material, it can be worn discreetly underneath normal clothing.
Exoskeletons can help reduce and prevent musculoskeletal injuries for warfighters and other personnel, he noted.