Expanded Slag

expanded slag

[ik′spand·əd ′slag]
(materials)
Slag formed by running slag from phosphate rock onto a forehearth at about 2000°F (1093°C) and then treating it with water, high-pressure steam, and air; used to make lightweight concrete blocks.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Expanded Slag

 

(Russian, termozit), a man-made, porous aggregate for lightweight concretes. Expanded slag is produced by swelling melts of blast-furnace slag and subsequently rapidly cooling the melt in water. The cooled material is crushed and sorted out. The particles in expanded slag are irregular in shape, have rough surfaces, and have a size up to 40 mm and a porosity that ranges from 30 to 80 percent. The bulk weight of expanded slag ranges from 250 to 1,200 kg/cu m. Expanded slag is the cheapest porous aggregate in regions with developed metallurgical industries.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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