upper explosive limit

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upper explosive limit

[¦əp·ər ik′splō·siv ‚lim·ət]
(chemistry)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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*PID sensors can detect concentrations of explosives and hydrocarbons below the Lower Explosive Limit (LEL).
Reference is also drawn to the theoretical understanding of flammable vapours with examples of how the Lower Explosive Limit can be converted into a meaningful quantity or volume of chemical per cubic metre of space.
The condition to ignite an air fuel mixture is the upper and lower explosive limit of a fuel.
When the ratio of flammable gas - such as that used in cooking gas cylinders - to air reaches what scientists call an "explosive limit", any minor spark can result in an explosion.
where [L.sub.t] is the lower limit of explosion at t[degrees]C, %; [U.sub.t] is the upper limit of blast at t[degrees]C, %; L is the upper explosive limit at normal temperature (25[degrees]C), %; L is the lower explosive limit of explosion at normal temperature (25[degrees]C), %; t is the temperature of the combustible gas, [degrees]C.
The monitoring is routinely achieved with a single instrument with multiple sensors that check volume of oxygen, percentage of the lower explosive limit of a calibrated gas and toxins that may be specific to the operation or could be present.
PHMSA regulations require operators to odorize combustible gas in a transmission line in Class 3 or Class 4 locations "so that at a concentration in air of one-fifth of the lower explosive limit, the gas is readily detectable by a person with a normal sense of smell."
"Gas has a range, from a lower explosive limit to a higher explosive limit,'' the district chief said.
At vapor-monitoring points and monitoring wells on the eastern edge of the former landfill, the gas repeatedly has been detected above the minimum explosive limit of 5 percent of air content, according to county officials.
This range falls between what is called the Lower Flammable Limit (LFL) or Lower Explosive Limit (LEL) and the Upper Flammable Limit (UFL) or Upper Explosive Limit (UEL).
In addition, power to mV pellistor-type detectors is automatically cut if the gas reading exceeds 95 percent of the gas' LEL (Lower Explosive Limit) to prevent sensor damage.

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