expression

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Related to Expressions: Idioms

expression

1. communication of emotion through music, painting, etc.
2. Maths a variable, function, or some combination of constants, variables, or functions
3. Genetics the effect of a particular gene on the phenotype

expression

[ik′spresh·ən]
(chemical engineering)
Separation of liquid from a two-phase solid-liquid system by compression under conditions that permit liquid to escape while the solid is retained between the compressing surfaces. Also known as mechanical expression.
(computer science)
A mathematical or logical statement written in a source language, consisting of a collection of operands connected by operations in a logical manner.

expression

(programming)
Any piece of program code in a high-level language which, when (if) its execution terminates, returns a value. In most programming languages, expressions consist of constants, variables, operators, functions, and parentheses. The operators and functions may be built-in or user defined. Languages differ on how expressions of different types may be combined - with some combination of explicit casts and implicit coercions.

The syntax of expressions generally follows conventional mathematical notation, though some languages such as Lisp or Forth have their own idiosyncratic syntax.

expression

(1) See Expression Studio.

(2) In programming, a line of source code that returns a value when executed. An expression can comprise any combination of variables, values, operators and functions. For example, a=b+c and price=2*cost are expressions. The more complicated expression (strlen(text_string)*2) is a C example that uses a string length function and returns a value that is twice the number of characters in the string of text. See regular expression.
References in classic literature ?
Romanticism, which in general prevails in modern literature, lays most emphasis on independence and fulness of expression and on strong emotion, and it may be comparatively careless of form.
The first expression of surprise passed from her face.
An expression of intense joy illumined the old man's eyes.
At these words there appeared in Noirtier's eye an expression of such deep meaning that the young girl thought she could read these words there: "You are mistaken; I can still do much for you.
He forgot his solo, and the expected compliments; and, for the rest of the evening, that thrilling expression floated in his brain, and was present to his thoughts; it was worth a thousand of the studied glances that were continually aimed at him from all sides of the room, and with every variety of eye--from the piercing black, to the ogling gray.
But, the moment that George was called on to take his part in the entertainment, this restlessness disappeared, and was succeeded by an expression of intense interest and deep anxiety.
By the smile that has just marred the expression of your countenance, Be candid, and tell me what your thought was -- no secrets between friends.
The princess continued to look at him without moving, and with the same dull expression.
the princess interrupted, smiling sardonically and not changing the expression of her eyes.
But his whole face suddenly bore the solemn rigidity of the dead, and his expression did not change during the whole time of the drive home.
Her voice, of immense power and sublime expression, gave to the rude, unpolished poetry of these psalms a magic and an effect which the most exalted Puritans rarely found in the songs of their brethren, and which they were forced to ornament with all the resources of their imagination.
Milady was so beautiful at this moment, the religious ecstasy in which she appeared to be plunged gave such an expression to her countenance, that Felton was so dazzled that he fancied he beheld the angel whom he had only just before heard.