extratropical cyclone

(redirected from Extratropical cyclones)

extratropical cyclone

[¦ek·strə¦träp·i·kəl ′sī‚klōn]
(meteorology)
Any cyclone-scale storm that is not a tropical cyclone. Also known as extratropical low; extratropical storm.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ongoing and future work will examine the structure and propagation of the MJO in greater detail, more thoroughly appraise the tropical mean state at 3-km resolution, and quantify improvements in tropical and extratropical cyclones and other synoptic structures at convection-permitting resolution.
I'm focusing on how we forecast extratropical cyclones, and how we can improve the models that forecast weather during those specific events.
In order to diagnose extratropical cyclones over the central United States, Morris (2001) interpolated the observational station data into grid data and removed the information with wavelengths less than 500 km using Barnes filter.
These are the low pressure areas you see on the weather map or, as they are officially called, "extratropical cyclones." A cyclone is a low pressure area, and extratropical means it formed outside of the tropics.
The analysis considers the combined risk posed by tropical storms and cyclones, floods, earthquakes, tsunamis, severe storms, extratropical cyclones, wildfires, storm surges, volcanoes and landslides.
In the Bohai Sea, storm surges caused by extratropical cyclones are more common compared with those induced by tropical cyclones [4].
A storm surge is an offshore rise of water associated with a low pressure weather system, typically tropical cyclones and strong extratropical cyclones. These storms cause high winds that batter the ocean's surface, creating massive waves.
There is no consensus in the scientific community concerning the impact of increasing temperatures on weather-related perils such as tropical and extratropical cyclones, severe thunderstorms and floods.
They describe the energy cycle, temperature, water in the atmosphere, global-scale winds, atmospheric-ocean interactions, air masses and fronts, extratropical cyclones and anticyclones, thunderstorms and tornadoes, small-scale winds, weather forecasting, past and present climates, and human influences on climate.
Extratropical cyclones produce much of the precipitation over the Arctic, but the details of this cause-effect relationship is not well documented.
The model includes the transition of hurricanes into extratropical cyclones, storms that affect the Atlantic coast north of Cape Hatteras, in particular, and that exhibit different characteristics from pure hurricanes, with distinct implications for loss estimates.