extreme point

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extreme point

[ek′strēm ′pȯint]
(mathematics)
A maximum or minimum value of a function.
A point in a convex subset K of a vector space is called extreme if it does not lie on the interior of any line segment contained in K.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the fractional derivatives at extreme points. Electronic Journal of Qualitative Theory of Differential Equations, 2012(55):1-5, 2012.
The combined abscissa is calculated as a weighted average of the two extreme points with f(x) as the weights.
We selected the top N extreme points with the largest gradient value as the candidate feature points.
Suppose that [K.sup.*] is the maximal K with respect to the optimal solution of function (2), and then the optimal solution [mathematical expression not reproducible] represents the valid extreme points to compute MAGE.
Brend's method [41] is used to find the extreme point [y.sub.c] with local maximum distance within each range.
As mentioned in the introduction, several results have been extended to the hyperspace WCC (X): In the next section, we shall further extend the notion of hyperspace and its corresponding topology [T.sub.w] where the underlying space X is a locally convex topological vector space instead of a Banach space and prove an extreme point theorem which is an extension of the classical Krein-Milman Theorem.
These five situations are "extreme value 29 characters," "extreme value 13 characters," "inflection point 29 characters," "inflection point 13 characters," and "extreme point + inflection point matrix." The clustering accuracy of each case is shown in Table 5.
In view of the characteristics of the objective function in terms of the number of plies, there are local extreme points corresponding to each ply number.
Since the polynomial is given by the transformation of the Chebyshev polynomial [T.sub.k-1](*) from [-1, 1] to [[[mu].sub.m], [[mu].sub.i+1]], there are k-2 extreme points in [[[mu].sub.m], [[mu].sub.i+1]].
To prove that a Lispchitz-free space is not isometric to [l.sub.1], we will exhibit two extreme points of its unit ball at distance less than one.
Americans are also about evenly matched at the most extreme points on the scale, with 20% opting for position "5," the most active possible government, and 17% opting for position "1," the most limited government.
While these two extreme points of view clash throughout the film, causing the main tension in the story, we must ask ourselves why we the viewers find ourselves immediately siding with Jude, when the director specifically leaves the real state of the baby's health ambiguous in the story.

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