eye tracking

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eye tracking

Using cameras to determine what people look at. Eye tracking follows the pupil movement of a person looking at a smartphone screen, printed ad, application user interface or Web page. For advertising, eye tracking analyzes what elements get the most attention. It can determine which parts of an application users notice first, and eye-tracking smartphones can automatically scroll the screen or keep it unlocked as long as the user is viewing.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Half of these participants were asked to wear a bike helmet under the coverstory that the eye tracker mounted on it measures their eye movements.
Researchers at Duke University used an eye tracker camera system to capture 217 subjects' eye movements as they considered two choices.
Performance analysis of professional football players kicking penalties, previously emotionally stimulated: the use of the eye tracker as a tool in football
It has an eye tracker and an in-built scanning laser ophthalmoscope that provides colour laser fundus imaging.
To this end, using an eye tracker and the CQT method of questioning, our aim was to detect deception in participants who had performed a realistic mock crime.
Canadian wearables start-up Thalmic Labs has been issued multiple patents by the United States Patent and Trademark Office relating to 'wearable heads-up displays with integrated eye tracker' utilising 'optical power holograms.'
Once the questionnaire was filled, the participants were asked to wear an eye tracker and carry on with their day to day tasks around the campus.
They had to wear an off-the-shelf head-mounted eye tracker on their errands, said Digital Trends.
He was able to communicate with others using a computer that he operates with his eyes movements (Tobii's eye tracker and communicator).
To detect the depth and volume on the images, a binocular eye tracker was used.
[5] examined the time course of gaze behaviours toward pain faces using the eye tracker. They found healthy adults initially preferred pain faces but this attentional preference declined over the course of time.