Eyepiece Camera

Eyepiece Camera

 

a photographic camera with a film holder but without an objective lens that is mounted on the eyepiece (ocular) end of a telescope, microscope, or other optical instrument.

There are several methods of using such a camera. In one method, the eyepiece part of the instrument is removed and is replaced by the camera in such a way that the emulsion of the photographic plate is located in the same plane as the real image of the object produced by the objective of the instrument. In a second method, the eyepiece of the instrument is pulled out slightly, so that its first focus is located beyond the image plane of the objective. In this case, the eyepiece functions as a projection system and forms a real image that has some additional magnification. In a third method, special projection eyepieces or other optical systems that produce a real image are used instead of an ordinary eyepiece.

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The general consensus was that it would be easiest and less expensive to use the cheaper eyepiece camera ([US$ 289] 1.3 MP AM-4023), if each site had access to a reasonably good dissecting scope and good external lighting that could be moved close to the computer for USB access to the camera installed through a trinocular head or through one of the eye-pieces.
Entry-level planetary video cameras include Orion's StarShoot USB Eyepiece Camera ($70), Orion's better StarShoot Solar System Color Imaging Camera IV ($100), and Celestron's more capable NexImage 5 Solar System Imager ($200).
The MiniVid Camera is an all-in-one eyepiece camera that easily attaches to any brand of microscope for instant video micrography and provides crisp, clear images in an instant.
It was instantly dubbed the "eyepiece camera," since the MX5 is designed to slip into, rather than attach to, a conventional 2-inch eyepiece holder!
The electronic gain of these eyepiece cameras is set automatically; the only user adjustment is for contrast.