Hans Jurgen Eysenck

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Eysenck, Hans Jurgen

(häns yo͝or`gən ī`sĕngk), 1916–97, British psychologist. Best known for his theory of human personality, Eysenck suggested that personality is biologically determined and is arranged in a hierarchy consisting of types, traits, habitual responses, and specific responses. A staunch critic of psychoanalysis, Eysenck maintained that the recovery rates of the emotionally disturbed were approximately equal for treated and untreated individuals, though the accuracy of his studies on the subject have been questioned in recent years. Among Eysenck's many works is The Intelligence Controversy (written with L. J. Kamin, 1981).
References in periodicals archive ?
Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI): This instrument allows for assessment and measurement of such dimensions of personality as neuroticism-stability, extraversion-introversion, psychoticism and lie in the context of Eysenck's personality theory.
Personality Traits: According to Eysenck Personality Inventory evaluations, 72.2% (n=13) of the sample showed neuroticism, 22.2% (n=4) showed outwardness, and 5.5% (n=1) were evaluated in the psychotic group.
Manual for the Eysenck Personality Inventory. San Diego: Educational and Industrial Testing Service.
Manual for the Eysenck Personality Inventory. San Diego, CA: Educational and Industrial Testing Service.
Self-rating and Eysenck Personality Inventory estimates of neuroticism and extraversion.
Another study required subjects to copy a paragraph on unlined paper, and also to take the Eysenck Personality Inventory as assessment of their level of extroversion.
Each battery consisted of the Profile of Mood States (POMS; McNair, Lorr, & Droppleman, 1971), the Sport Competition Anxiety Test (SCAT; Martens, 1977), the Sports Attitude Inventory (SAI; Willis, 1982), Levenson's Locus of Control (IPC; Levenson, 1981), and the Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI; Eysenck & Eysenck, 1982).
There were meaningful correlations with the Mini-Mult, an abbreviated form of Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (Kincannon, 1968), the Study of Values Manual (Allport, Vernon, & Lindzey, 1960), the Eysenck Personality Inventory (Eysenck, 1958), and the Personality Research Form (Jackson, 1967).
The neuroticism scale of the Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI-N; Eysenck & Eysenck, 1968)was included as a measure of negative affectivity.
Thus, the primary purpose of the present study was to provide evidence for the discriminant validity of the SFNA by examining correlations among self-reports of stressors and strains while controlling for NA using two different measures: the SFNA, and a popular measure of NA that has been shown to contain strain content, the Neuroticism scale of the Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI-N; Eysenck & Eysenck, 1968).
Each battery consisted of the Profile of Mood States (POMS; McNair, Loft, & Droppleman, 1971), the Sports Attitude Inventory (SAI; Willis, 1982), the Sport Competition Anxiety Test (SCAT; Martens, 1977), the Controlled Repression-Sensitization Scale (CR-S; Handel, 1973), Levenson's Locus of Control (LOC; Levenson, 1981), the Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI; Eysenck & Eysenck, 1982), and the Psychological Skills Inventory for Sport (PSIS; Mahoney, Gabriel, & Perkins, 1987).