Ezzelino da Romano


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Ezzelino da Romano

Ezzelino da Romano (ĕtˌsālēˈnō dä rōmäˈnō), 1194–1259, Italian Ghibelline leader (see Guelphs and Ghibellines) and soldier. After 1232 a faithful supporter of Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II against the pope, he held Verona, Vicenza, Padua, and other cities. When Frederick defeated (1237) the Lombard League at Cortenuova, Ezzelino became the greatest power in N Italy. He married (1238) an illegitimate daughter of Frederick. Continuously at war with the Guelphs, he was excommunicated (1254) by Pope Innocent IV, and a strong alliance was formed against him. Ezzelino lost (1256) Padua, but in 1258 he took Brescia. After an attempt to conquer Milan he was defeated and wounded at Cassano and died in prison. Placed by Dante in the Inferno, he is remembered as a cruel tyrant.
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References in periodicals archive ?
These legendary accounts served the regimes that commissioned works and monuments to propagate them: the merchant commune of Padua after throwing off Ezzelino da Romano in 1260, late thirteenth-century Genoa with its partisan politics, Siena under the newly formed regime of the Nine, and Perugia with its expanding economy and university.
Nella Vittoria (a cura di Stefano Tomassini), che narra della famosa congiura contro Pier Delle Vigne, la medesima polarita si ritrova puntualmente tra le figure dei diabolici congiurati Ezzelino da Romano e del negromante Asdente da una parte, e dell'integerrimo segretario dall'altra.
His Latin poems and the tragedy Ecerinis, based on the life of the Veronese tyrant Ezzelino da Romano, foreshadow Italian humanism.