fare

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fare

Transport the sum charged or paid for conveyance in a bus, train, aeroplane, etc.

What does it mean when you dream about a fare?

Paying a fare in a dream can reflect the price we have to pay to achieve a certain aim.

References in classic literature ?
A waiter had brought the rough pencil draft of the Home Restaurant's next day fare in old Schulenberg's angular hand.
To-day there were more changes on the bill of fare than usual.
Sarah was crying over her bill of fare. Tears from the depths of some divine despair rose in her heart and gathered to her eyes.
To prevent, therefore, giving offence to their customers by any such disappointment, it hath been usual with the honest and well-meaning host to provide a bill of fare which all persons may peruse at their first entrance into the house; and having thence acquainted themselves with the entertainment which they may expect, may either stay and regale with what is provided for them, or may depart to some other ordinary better accommodated to their taste.
As we do not disdain to borrow wit or wisdom from any man who is capable of lending us either, we have condescended to take a hint from these honest victuallers, and shall prefix not only a general bill of fare to our whole entertainment, but shall likewise give the reader particular bills to every course which is to be served up in this and the ensuing volumes.
That's why I had to ask you to pay my fare. You see, I'm not too proud to use your money after all.'
I should be most thankful if you could get me there in time, and will gladly pay you an extra fare."
On Jerry's return to the rank there was a good deal of laughing and chaffing at him for driving hard to the train for an extra fare, as they said, all against his principles, and they wanted to know how much he had pocketed.
"How if we were to change our program, Levin?" he said keeping his finger on the bill of fare. And his face expressed serious hesitation.
The Tatar, recollecting that it was Stepan Arkadyevitch's way not to call the dishes by the names in the French bill of fare, did not repeat them after him, but could not resist rehearsing the whole menus to himself according to the bill:--"Soupe printaniere, turbot, sauce Beaumarchais, poulard a l'estragon, macedoine de fruits...etc.," and then instantly, as though worked by springs, laying down one bound bill of fare, he took up another, the list of wines, and submitted it to Stepan Arkadyevitch.
Game was scanty, and they had to eke out their scanty fare with wild roots and vegetables, such as the Indian potato, the wild onion, and the prairie tomato, and they met with quantities of "red root," from which the hunters make a very palatable beverage.
They pitched their camp in the grove, kindled their fires, partook merrily of their rude fare, and resigned themselves to the sweetest sleep they had enjoyed since their outset upon the prairies.