FDR


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FDR

(1) (Flight Data Recorder) See black box.

(2) (Fourteen Data Rate) See InfiniBand.
References in periodicals archive ?
While their political views were radically different, both TR and FDR were epitomes of American machismo, although with some differences.
Although FDR tried to hide it, the perilous state of his health was painfully evident to almost everyone who saw him up close.
"FDR involves the flight data and the plane engine's parameters that should be analyzed to find the reason for the plane crash," the official added.
From that point on in the book, Wicker doesn't spend a lot of time chronicling Roosevelt's life; instead she looks at isolated events and becomes most convincing when she ties what FDR said to what he did.
FDR to Spur no-3 of New Segregating Embankment on the right bank of river Teesta in PS &Dist-Jalpaigurt.
As one adviser wrote, FDR "had an exceptionally agile mind" that sucked up everything he was taught and sometimes got ahead of his teachers.
Although it is still not well known within the atmospheric sciences, the FDR method is the best available approach to analysis of multiple hypothesis test results, even when those results are mutually correlated.
Fujifilm Medical Systems USA has simultaneously released its FDR Clinica X-Ray Components.
Chronicling McNutt's life from birth to death, Kotlowski includes details about how the famous Hoosier's life and political career intersected at numerous, pivotal crossroads with that of American President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR).
Moley argued that FDR was free of ideology while Tugwell claimed that the "brain trusters" had convinced FDR to face economic realities and regretted only that bolder proposals might have created a mandate for more reforms that might have overcome the "southern reactionaries" who later opposed New Deal plans (pp.
HAMBY, A DISTINGUISHED PROFESSOR of history emeritus at Ohio University and the author of several well-written, deeply researched volumes on 20th-century American politics, disputes the view put forth during and after FDR's lifetime that he was little more than a "facile opportunist]." True, he never pursued the intellectual credentials that his illustrious cousin Theodore Roosevelt or Woodrow Wilson achieved.
Most strikingly, his narrative does a marvelous job of capturing the flavor of FDR's decision making.