FED


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.

fed

US slang an agent of the FBI

FED

FED

(Field Emission Display) A flat panel display that provides an image quality equal to or better than a CRT. Like a CRT, it uses a vacuum-filled chamber and phosphor-coated glass. However, instead of illuminating phosphors with three "guns" that scan the entire screen, FEDs use hundreds of millions of stationary emitters, with some 1600 of them per pixel. Some designs use low voltage emission and high current while others use high voltage and low current, which is more like a standard CRT.

Invented in the 1970s
Although the field emission display was invented in the 1970s, it took more than two decades to produce working models. With hundreds of patents on the technology, PixTech was the pioneer in this field with small displays in production in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Other companies including Futaba, Ratheon, Motorola, TI, Candescent and Sony were also involved in FED development. However, during that same period, advances in active matrix LCDs were extraordinary, and although FEDs were considered more rugged and useful in harsher environments than LCD panels, the technology has yet to see any mass market. See surface-conduction electron-emitter display.


The FED Technology
This illustration, which is somewhat conceptual, shows how the energy flows from the microtips to the phosphors (anode). Electrons from the negatively charged (-) cone column are emitted when the gate row is positively charged (+). The electrons then flow to the phosphors that are momentarily given a larger positive charge (+++), which, in this diagram, are the red ones. The pixels are addressed 180 times per second, providing a very high refresh rate. (Redrawn from illustration courtesy of PixTech.)
References in periodicals archive ?
Subsequently these babies are bottle fed for a short period of time.
Before its meeting in August, the Fed had raised rates by a quarter point for 17 consecutive meetings, a two-year series of rises that brought interest from a historical low of 1%.
Not only did Greenspan fail to raise rates or margin requirements, but also in the late 1990s, the Fed chairman actually began to talk in glowing terms about the New Economy, conceding that technology had helped increase productivity.
If the Fed is focused solely on creating positive inflation at a time that both productivity and aggregate demand are high, it will create too much liquidity as a byproduct.
In recent years, the Fed has defined its mission as that of stimulating "aggregate demand" in order to keep the economy afloat.
The Creature from Jekyll Island, meanwhile, made the Fed out to be a creature of robber barrons, while William Greider's Secrets of The Temple: How The Federal Reserve Runs The Country made it seem like a creature of the executive branch.
As it progressed down the tray, it fed very shallow, only about 1/8 of an inch.
But during Greenspan's long reign as Fed chairman, which began a few months before the 1987 stock market crash, the shroud of secrecy surrounding Fed deliberations has slipped a bit In 1994, the powerful Open Market Committee began releasing its decisions on interest rates on the day they were made, and last year it began stating the Fed's bias about future moves.
6 times as much of these neurotoxic chemicals in their blood plasma as do children who had been fed infant formula only.
When news of mad cow disease first began to break, Britons were shocked to discover that their cud-chewing, or ruminant, cattle were being fed animal parts.