flare


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Related to flare: solar flare

flare

1. Optics
a. the unwanted light reaching the image region of an optical device by reflections inside the instrument, etc.
b. the fogged area formed on a negative by such reflections
2. Astronomy short for solar flare
3. Aeronautics the final transition phase of an aircraft landing, from the steady descent path to touchdown
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Flare

 

a signal or illuminating rocket, used by troops for mutual identification, target indication, transmission of commands, and short-term illumination of the terrain.

Signal and illuminating rockets are identical in design and differ only by what is called the star, which contains a pyrotechnic compound appropriate to the purpose. The flare has a cardboard casing with a metal bottom and is filled with a propelling charge, the star, and wadding (for packing). The star is fired from a special flare pistol or launched by hand using the attachment on the bottom of the cartridge. It burns for five to seven seconds and has a radius of illumination of 100 m; it may project a signal, the color of which depends on the pyrotechnic compound. The rocket is visible at night for distances of up to 7 km and during the day for up to 2 km.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

flare

[fler]
(aerospace engineering)
To descend in a smooth curve, making a transition from a relatively steep descent to a direction substantially parallel to the surface, when landing an aircraft.
(astronomy)
A bright eruption from the sun's chromosphere; flares may appear within minutes and fade within an hour, cover a wide range of intensity and size, and tend to occur between sunspots or over their penumbrae.
(chemical engineering)
A device for disposing of combustible gases from refining or chemical processes by burning in the open, in contrast to combustion in a furnace or closed vessel or chamber.
(design engineering)
An expansion at the end of a cylindrical body, as at the base of a rocket.
(electronics)
A radar screen target indication having an enlarged and distorted shape due to excessive brightness.
(electromagnetism)
(engineering)
A pyrotechnic item designed to produce a single source of intense light for such purposes as target or airfield illumination.
(naval architecture)
A concave curve of a boat's or ship's sides away from the center line, above the waterline, normally at the bow.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

flare

flare
i. A maneuver carried out just before touchdown to reduce the rate of descent, so that the aircraft settles on the runway smoothly and with the least amount of vertical speed. Normally referred to as flare-out.
ii. A magnesium candle supported by a small parachute, which was at one time carried by most aircraft operating at night. This flare was fired if it became necessary to force land. The burning flare produced sufficient light to enable a pilot to see the ground for making a landing. Flares are pyrotechnic devices used for signaling or to provide illumination.
iii. A cone-shaped expansion on the end of tubing. Tubing used in aircraft fluid lines flared at an angle of 37°.
iv. Infrared flares meant to deflect incoming infrared missiles.
v. A waveguide in which one or both transverse dimensions increase toward the aperture. Also called a horn.
vi. As it relates to aerial photography, light reaching the photosensitive emulsion, resulting from internal reflections within the lens, such as occur from a noncoated air-glass lens surface.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
ExxonMobil has committed to optimising timescales to install ground flares, whcih will significantly address impacts from flaring.
Another standout feature among the Flare S8 series, is the Plus' pop-up front camera.
Flint's Coastguard team confirmed they assisted in the search after the flare was spotted in the New Brighton area.
If you've been taking preventive gout medicine for a long time and you're having flares for the first time in a while, call your doctor.
The implementation of a recently signed legal framework on flare gas reduction by President Muhammadu Buhari, is expected to lead to a government takeover of fields where flaring is taking place and a bid round of some of such fields before the end of 2018.
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More than its superb camera features, the Flare S6 Selfie sports a 5.2' full-HD screen for a more enhanced and defined mobile viewing.
Lets take a detailed look at what causes solar flares, and how their impact is felt on Earth.
Between (http://www.ibtimes.com/intense-solar-storm-coming-earth-may-cause-auroras-beached-whales-2587386) all the solar flares and coronal mass ejections shooting out of the sun since the beginning the month sending radiation and charged particles toward Earth, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Space Weather Prediction Center has put geomagnetic storm warnings in place, anticipating how it would interact with the magnetic field around our planet.
Schimke said the original flare at Knott Landfill has been burning at full capacity for more than a year.
Critics have pointed out that the gas Iran flares could have produced more electricity than several Bushehr nuclear power plants--and done that at much less cost.
Combustion technologies company ClearSign Combustion (NasdaqCM:CLIR) disclosed on Thursday that it has won a multi-flare contract, valued at over USD1m, from a major California oil producer to retrofit its enclosed wellhead ground flares with ClearSign's Duplex technology to ensure compliance with air district emission requirements.