Fabii

Fabii

 

members of a patrician gens in ancient Rome. The Fabii took part in nearly all the leading events in Roman history. At Veii in 477 B.C., for example, 306 of them perished in the battle against the Etruscans. Among the foremost members of the gens were the military commander Quintus Fabius Maximus Cunctator and the historian Quintus Fabius Pictor.

References in periodicals archive ?
The earliest technique for changing the rear decoration in the Italian Renaissance productions at the Florentine Medici court appears to have been the use of a large periaktos for the 1568 production of Il Fabii, designed by Baldassare Lanci da Urbino, in the Salone dei Cinquecento of the Palazzo Vecchio.
Here Ovid praises his addressee Fabius Maximus: Hercules was the legendary ancestor of the Fabii (cf.
Fray Luis confiesa, agarrandose a un dicho de Quintiliano y trayendolo a su molino; <<cuius lectio, ut Fabii verbis utar, non scholarum temporibus, sed vitae spatio terminatur>> (20).
Having "made" the Fabii arouse the Gauls' ire by violating the ius gentium (law of nations) and then "ordained" an atypical Roman passivity in the face of their attack, Fortune showed that she had "decided ...
En el cuarto capi?1/2tulo otros dos trabajos: "Ciencias sociales del creer y creencias de las ciencias sociales", de Fabii?1/2n Sanabria-S., y "Globalizacii?1/2n y catolicismos: la mirada desde arriba y las relaciones cotidianas", de Fortunato Mallimacci.
265-7 the poet criticizes matronae who perform as gladiators -- something a ludia would never do ('dicite vos neptes Lepidi caecive Metelli/Gurgitis aut Fabii, quae ludia sumpserit umquam/hos habitus, quando ad palum gemat uxor Asyli').(29) Far from being a pejorative term here, ludia is applied to someone whose behaviour, though she is of low status, is favourably compared to that of the matronae who defy convention by appearing in the arena.