Fauxbourdon

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Fauxbourdon

 

(French, “false bass”), a type of polyphonic singing that developed in the 15th and 16th centuries. In faux-bourdon, the cantus firmus was placed in the highest voice, and the middle voice followed in parallel fourths; the bass moved in parallel sixths or octaves with the highest voice, which was often embellished and filled out with musical ornaments. The term refers to the basic structure of the fauxbourdon, which was conceived and notated as a series of parallel triads in which the lowest voice was to be sung an octave higher than written.

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By contrast, the issue of faburden as a generative component in early Anglican chants is well handled, and the effect of later improvisatory practices on the transmission of tunes is evidenced in full, as is shown for example in a later chapter in relation to the Chetham Te Deum (1718) and its variants.
I keepe my old course, to palter vp some thing in Prose, vsing mine old poesie still, Omne tulit punctum, although latelye two Gentlemen Poets, made two mad men of Rome beate it out of their paper bucklers: & had it in derision, for that I could not make my verses iet vpon the stage in tragicall buskins, euerie worde filling the mouth like the faburden of Bo-Bell, daring God out of heauen with that Atheist Tamburlan, or blaspheming with the mad preest of the sonne: but let me rather openly pocket vp the Asse at Diogenes hand: then wantonlye set out such impious instances of intollerable poetrie, such mad and scoffing poets, that haue propheticall spirits as bred of Merlins race, if there be anye in England that set the end of scollarisme in an English blanck verse.
In this edition, reconstruction of the tenor parts has revealed much about the use of plainsong and faburden, either as a structural basis or as material for incidental reference.
The logic is therefore that the English developed faburden and gave it a perfectly logical name which described precisely what was happening, that is, singing or sighting fa.