prosopagnosia

(redirected from Face blindness)
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prosopagnosia

[‚präs·ō·pag′nōzh·yə]
(psychology)
The inability to recognize familiar faces.
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das principle fach heifit face blindness "Ereignisse dieser Art werden oft vergessen, vor allem dann, wenn kurze Zeit spater das vorzeitige Ableben des betreffendnen Vaters auf sie folgt." ob das ein versprechen ich erinnere oder ein facher!
The fitness to practise committee found that Mr Jordan acted outside his scope of practice as a dispensing optician by diagnosing multiple patients with prosopagnosia (face blindness).
Although he rents an apartment and starts forming personal ties and relationships, he has trouble fitting in because of his face blindness, a rare neurological condition.
Bob Cockshott, 58, has face blindness, or prosopagnosia.
12 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), the study illustrates for the first time how individuals with prosopagnosia, or face blindness, are still able to recognize other people's movements.
"We suspect that he is suffering from a rare condition known as prosopagnosia, which is also known as face blindness," an expert said.
Others --about 2 percent of the general population--are born with face blindness. It was from such studies that scientists discovered that some people actually excel at face recognition.
Both our opportunistic and structured systems have failed these patients, many of whom face blindness. There is an urgent need to turn this situation around and to enable patients to know the level of severity of their DR and provide them with the necessary information to modify their risk factors and change their health-seeking behaviour.
The pair hookup ("wow, that was so fast") and then Lindsay learns that he suffers from the same problem Brad Pitt has 6 face blindness. Mark can't tell if she's pretty or not, and tells her that he only slept with her to make sure she wasn't a man.
Their findings will change the future of neural visual perception research and allow scientists to use this discovery to develop targeted remedies for disorders such as face blindness.
Prosopagnosia - also known as face blindness - is believed to affect one in 50 people, but there could be many more who are undiagnosed.
She offers lucid explanations of the science behind face blindness and explores the differences between developmental prosopagnosia, which starts in childhood, and situational, which occurs as a result of brain injury or illness.