FaceCash

FaceCash

An earlier smartphone payments system from Think Computer Corporation, Palo Alto, California that replaced the plastic debit card. Anyone with a smartphone could use it by opening and depositing funds into a FaceCash account. When making a purchase at a store, the merchant scanned a barcode displayed on the phone, and a photo of the customer's face was sent to the cash register for visual ID. A mobile app could also store the barcodes from other loyalty and ID cards. See Web payment service.
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law led FaceCash to withdraw from doing business in the state).
FaceCash is a particularly colorful example of how difficult it can
The user could pay by opening the FaceCash mobile app and
venture (as FaceCash did) or terminate services in states with tougher
72) Information for California Residents, FaceCash (Nov.
For example, the payments startup FaceCash created a mobile application that enabled participating merchants to view a photo of the consumer before approving a POS purchase (Hernandez 2010).
Aaron Greenspan, a former Harvard student who owns a mobile payment system called FaceCash, asked for more time to oppose the application, but never filed any objection within the extended time period.
Now Greenspan, who developed the mobile payment app FaceCash, has asked for an extension to file an objection to Facebook's attempt to trademark "face.