Karl Kraus

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Kraus, Karl

 

Born Apr. 28, 1874, in Gitschin, now Jičín, Czechoslovakia; died June 12, 1936, in Vienna. Austrian writer, publicist, and philologist.

In 1897, Kraus wrote a satirical lampoon, “Destroyed Literature,” against the Viennese decadents. He published and edited the journal Die Fackel (1899–1936), in which he carried on polemics with bourgeois philosophical, political, and aesthetic ideas. He published many essays and articles on literature and language and collections of satirical feuilletons and aphorisms about international and Austrian life. His major work was the philosophical antiwar drama The Last Days of Mankind (1918–19). In his lampoon “The Invincible Ones” (1928), Kraus glorified the Viennese workers who, in the summer of 1927, stormed a reactionary law court. Kraus’ verse, written in the spirit of Goethe’s philosophical lyric poetry, often approached the impressionist poetry of C. Morgenstern and D. von Liliencron. His style is filled with metaphors and contrasts.

WORKS

Werke, vols. [1–9]. Munich, 1955–61.

REFERENCES

Iggers, W. A. Karl Kraus: A Viennese Critic of the Twentieth Century. The Hague, 1967. (Bibliography, pp. 230–45.)
Engelmann, P. Dem Andenken an Karl Kraus. Vienna [1967].
Kuhn, C. Karl Kraus als Lyriker. Paris, 1968.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kraus was far from alone in this, and there was a whole host of writers and thinkers who recognized the need for the ethical critique that Kraus subjected the monarchy's society and culture to in the pages of his satirical journal, Die Fackel.
The astonishing spectacle of Wilhelm Liebknecht, doyen of German social democracy, publishing a series of harsh anti-Dreyfusard articles in young Karl Kraus's journal Die Fackel can be put down to a mistrust of the liberal press and the fear that the German Reich might use the affair as an excuse to take a hard line toward a discredited France.
Wittgenstein's view of Freud was tempered by his own reappraisal of positivism, and his view on the purity of language came from the Viennese satirist and critic Krauss who in the journal Die Fackel wrote: "Psychoanalysis is that spiritual disease of which it considers itself to be the cure.
Kraus, especially through the publication of a literary and political review, Die Fackel (The Torch), offered critical, satirical, and sometimes brutal commentary on fin de siecle Vienna, leading up to the rise of German fascism.
Kraus published Die FackeL (The Torch), a satirical journal largely written by Kraus himself.
His primary vehicle, the magazine Die Fackel (The Torch), was both the toast and scorn of Austria.
Wittgenstein's view of Freud was tempered by his own reappraisal of positivism and his view on the purity of language came from the Viennese satirist and critic Krauss who in the journal Die Fackel wrote 'Psychoanalysis is that spiritual disease of which it considers itself to be the cure.
His vicious attacks on prominent citizens, his unscrupulous gossip mongering and shameless attention seeking prompted the Austrian writer Karl Kraus to launch a ferocious counterattack in his journal Die Fackel (The Torch).
Jahr S, Hentze H, Englisch S, Hardt D, Fackel mayer FO, Hesch RD, et al.
Die Zuge seines acht antiken Hauptes erhielten sich auch nach entschwundenen Lebensfunken; aber der Genius des Todes welcher--vor sein Sterbelager tratt brauchte dessen Fackel nur langsam zu wenden um die leicht verhauchte Lebensflamme schwinden zu sehen.
The satire of Kraus's Fackel and the grotesque comedy of the drama represent and oppose the horrors of violence and the perversion of elements of the carnival.