Munchausen syndrome

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Munchausen syndrome

[′mu̇n‚chau̇z·ən ‚sin‚drōm]
(psychology)
A personality disorder in which the patient describes dramatic but false symptoms or simulates acute illness, happily undergoing examinations, hospitalization, and diagnostic and therapeutic manipulations, and upon discovery of the real nature of his case often leaves without notice and moves on to another hospital.
References in periodicals archive ?
Factitious disorder (indirect via chemicals and other objects) 13.
A factitious disorder (FD) involves the intentional falsification of physical or psychological signs or symptoms or the induction of injury or disease associated with identified deception even in the absence of obvious external rewards (1).
In the literature on factitious disorder, a similar problem led Hollender and Hersh to recommend having the primary care physician confront the patient so the psychiatrist can avoid the prosecutorial role [18].
Factitious disorder as repeated diabetic ketoacidosis: a case report.
Pediatric condition falsification (Munchausen syndrome by proxy) as a continuum of maternal factitious disorder (Munchausen syndrome).
Shaw RJ, Dayal S, Hartman JK, DeMaso DR: Factitious disorder by proxy: pediatric condition falsification.
Disorders] diagnostic criteria for factitious disorder by proxy require
The syndrome - now known as Factitious disorder, or Fabricated or induced illness (FII) - occurs when someone in charge of a child fakes or induces illness in the youngster to attract attention.
(1) Today, most experts use it to describe a rare form of factitious disorder in which patients actively seek to assume the sick role to gain attention, sympathy, and comfort from medical personnel.
In such cases, where the appropriate non-somatoform diagnosis would be Factitious Disorder With Predominantly Physical Signs or Malingering, intentionally produced symptoms "should not count toward a diagnosis of Somatization Disorder.
Psychological conditions such bulimia, anorexia, or factitious disorder can mimic a food allergy, for example.