Faerie Queene

Faerie Queene

allegorical epic poem by Edmund Spenser. [Br. Lit.: Faerie Queene]
See: Epic

Faerie Queene (Gloriana)

gives a champion to people in trouble. [Br. Lit.: The Faerie Queene]
References in classic literature ?
The Faerie Queene (verse, sixteenth century spelling).
This differentiation in the space of virtue generates the entire quest in the Faerie Queene.
AS CRITICS HAVE LONG RECOGNIZED, Book VI of Edmund Spensers Faerie Queene features some of the most supremely metapoetic fictions in the entire poem.
The book also discusses William LanglandAEs Piers Plowman, Edmund SpenserAEs The Faerie Queene, and John BunyanAEs The PilgrimAEs Progress.
The Secret Life of Books: The Faerie Queene BBC Four, 8.
Using the character of Duessa as a focal point, this research illuminates the ways in which Spenser used The Faerie Queene to not just echo but present his idiosyncratic stance on the threat of Catholicism to the English people.
1) His landmark Allegory of Love (1936) dedicates its final chapter to this 16th-century romance-epic, and his posthumously published Spenser's Images of Life [SIL] (1967), closes with a testimony to a lifelong admiration for the poem: "The Faerie Queene never loses a reader it has once gained.
Other topics include infants and the battle for the future in The Faerie Queene, Milton's compressed memory in Areopagitica of Spenser's Cave of Mammon, art and objectivity in the House of Busirane, Spenser's "May" eclogue and charitable admonition, Henry Lok and holy disorder in devotional lyric, evidence from Thomas Middleton on Spenserianism and satire before and after the bishops' ban, and a mortgage agreement of Edmund Spenser's grandson Hugolin Spenser.
Spencer remains famous because of his pastoral verses and in particular, his epic poem The Faerie Queene which first appeared in part in 1590.
So he began his publishing career with a set of 12 pastorals, and planned an enormous 24-book allegorical romance-epic, The Faerie Queene, to glorify Elizabeth I and her Britain as Vergil had glorified Rome and Augustus.
Here's a great way to connect history class to an English class with this excerpt from Elizabeth I, which discusses the relevance of author Edmund Spenser and explains some technicalities of his famous work, The Faerie Queene.
In literature, in Spenser's The Faerie Queene, published in the sixteenth century, what type of creature was Orgoglio: a giant or an elf?