Faerie Queene

Faerie Queene

allegorical epic poem by Edmund Spenser. [Br. Lit.: Faerie Queene]
See: Epic

Faerie Queene (Gloriana)

gives a champion to people in trouble. [Br. Lit.: The Faerie Queene]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Royal Mint chief engraver William Wyon depicted Victoria as Una, of the popular Elizabethan poem The Faerie Queene by Edmund Spenser.
The Faerie Queene: battleground for Una (Truth) and Duessa (Untruth)
The Faerie Queene as Children's Literature: Victorian and Edwardian Retellings in Words and Pictures
AS CRITICS HAVE LONG RECOGNIZED, Book VI of Edmund Spensers Faerie Queene features some of the most supremely metapoetic fictions in the entire poem.
Following an introduction that situates the overarching question of identity in its early modern context and sets the parameters for what a mermaid is and how she figures culturally and on the Elizabethan stage, four chapters and an afterword each present a case study of the mermaid figure as it appears in five early modern works: Thomas Dekker and Thomas Middleton's The Roaring Girl (1611), Margaret Cavendish's The Convent of Pleasure (1668), Book Two of Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queene (1590), William Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra (1606), and Shakespeare's Hamlet (1603).
The Secret Life of Books: The Faerie Queene BBC Four, 8.30pm The documentary series exploring classic works of literature returns, with historian Janina Ramirez investigating The Faerie Queene, Edmund Spenser's epic Elizabethan poem, which features fantasy elements including elves, nymphs, dragons and questing knights, but may mask the author's commentary on the brutal Tudor occupation of Ireland.
This research looks at Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queene, one of the earliest and most celebrated pieces of epic poetry in the English language.
LEWIS'S FIRST AND LAST published books of criticism pay tribute to Edmund Spenser's Faerie Queene. (1) His landmark Allegory of Love (1936) dedicates its final chapter to this 16th-century romance-epic, and his posthumously published Spenser's Images of Life [SIL] (1967), closes with a testimony to a lifelong admiration for the poem: "The Faerie Queene never loses a reader it has once gained.
Other topics include infants and the battle for the future in The Faerie Queene, Milton's compressed memory in Areopagitica of Spenser's Cave of Mammon, art and objectivity in the House of Busirane, Spenser's "May" eclogue and charitable admonition, Henry Lok and holy disorder in devotional lyric, evidence from Thomas Middleton on Spenserianism and satire before and after the bishops' ban, and a mortgage agreement of Edmund Spenser's grandson Hugolin Spenser.
Spencer remains famous because of his pastoral verses and in particular, his epic poem The Faerie Queene which first appeared in part in 1590.
So he began his publishing career with a set of 12 pastorals, and planned an enormous 24-book allegorical romance-epic, The Faerie Queene, to glorify Elizabeth I and her Britain as Vergil had glorified Rome and Augustus.
Here's a great way to connect history class to an English class with this excerpt from Elizabeth I, which discusses the relevance of author Edmund Spenser and explains some technicalities of his famous work, The Faerie Queene.