Faerie Queene

Faerie Queene

allegorical epic poem by Edmund Spenser. [Br. Lit.: Faerie Queene]
See: Epic

Faerie Queene (Gloriana)

gives a champion to people in trouble. [Br. Lit.: The Faerie Queene]
References in classic literature ?
The Faerie Queene (verse, sixteenth century spelling).
The Secret Life of Books: The Faerie Queene BBC Four, 8.
Using the character of Duessa as a focal point, this research illuminates the ways in which Spenser used The Faerie Queene to not just echo but present his idiosyncratic stance on the threat of Catholicism to the English people.
In its inclusion of non-canonical literary works, the book "insists on both the literary interest of such texts--some periodically dismissed as doggerel or hackwork--and the value of examining works such as Hamlet or The Faerie Queene alongside texts that do similar aesthetic work or aim for a similar imaginative impact" (7).
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Rovang explores the influence of The Faerie Queene, one of the works C.
In the section on Spenser, which considers his translations in Jan van der Noot's Theater for Voluptuous Worldlings (1569), The Shepheardes Calendar (1579), and The Faerie Queene (1590), Knapp moves on from Ernest Gilman's influential assumption that '"[d]epending on the passage of his work that falls open, one can find in Spenser a militant reformer on the question of images or a lover of decoration and display willing to employ more traditional discriminations between their use and abuse'" (48) to suggest a coherent trajectory.
Spencer remains famous because of his pastoral verses and in particular, his epic poem The Faerie Queene which first appeared in part in 1590.
Other topics include infants and the battle for the future in The Faerie Queene, Milton's compressed memory in Areopagitica of Spenser's Cave of Mammon, art and objectivity in the House of Busirane, Spenser's "May" eclogue and charitable admonition, Henry Lok and holy disorder in devotional lyric, evidence from Thomas Middleton on Spenserianism and satire before and after the bishops' ban, and a mortgage agreement of Edmund Spenser's grandson Hugolin Spenser.
IN Book 1, canto 9 of Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queene (FQ), Arthur, Una, and a weakened Redcrosse Knight unknowingly travel to the House of Holiness.
but soon find, as do the heroes in the Faerie Queene and their laboring
Prof Fernie is spearheading The Faerie Queene Now: Remaking Religious Poetry for Today's World project.