Fahrenheit 451


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Fahrenheit 451

describes a future America in which books are prohibited and burned. [Am. Lit.: Bradbury Fahrenheit 451 in Weiss, 289]

Fahrenheit 451

in an America of the future the fireman’s job is to burn all books that have been concealed from authorities. [Am. Lit.: Bradbury Fahrenheit 451 in Weiss, 289]
See: Fire

Fahrenheit 451

in a future America where books are prohibited, a group of people memorize texts in order to preserve their content. [Am. Lit.: Bradbury Fahrenheit 451 in Weiss, 289]
See: Memory
References in periodicals archive ?
Ray Bradbury's novel Fahrenheit 451 once described an oppressive future, where a fireman whose duty is to destroy all books begins to question his task.
Activities include "Friending Facebook in the Classroom" and "Visualizing Text." The sample activities use Fahrenheit 451 but can be adapted to any text.
In fact, its closest cousins are films such as Logan's Run (1976) and Fahrenheit 451 (1966).
The novel's dystopian concepts are intriguing and as easy to imagine as wall-sized TV screens must have been when Bradbury published Fahrenheit 451 in 1953, and the vivid, concrete world of Brazil, from its beaches to its favelas, lends a solidity and vividness to the novel's high-concept concerns.
"Fahrenheit 451'' Reading Readers will read aloud from Ray Bradbury's "Fahrenheit 451,'' starting at 12:30 p.m.
Stanley Kauffmann, the erudite critic, author and editor who reviewed movies for the New Republic for more than 50 years, wrote his own plays and fiction, and helped discover the classic novels "Fahrenheit 451" and "The Moviegoer," died of pneumonia in Manhattan on Oct.
Best known for his dystopian novel Fahrenheit 451 (1953) and for the science fiction and horror stories gathered together as The Martian Chronicles (1950) and The Illustrated Man (1951), Bradbury was one of the most celebrated 20th-century American writers.
Better known are Fahrenheit 451 and The Martian Chronicles* which are really political novels, in the Orwellian dystopian sense--and I do put Bradbury up there with Orwell.
AUTHOR Ray Bradbury, who wrote Fahrenheit 451 and The Martian Chronicles, has died at the age of 91.
Ray Bradbury, the author of controversial and popular reads such as the science fiction book "Fahrenheit 451" and "Dandelion Wine," has died at the age of 91, and fans and fellow authors are expressing their condolences on Twitter.
10th Ave.; youth can register and pick up books in advance; teen book group will discuss "Fahrenheit 451" and Tim Hamilton's graphic novel "Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451: The Authorized Adaptation"; tween scene group for grades 4-6 will discuss "The Landry News" by Andrew Clements; free.
Alas, from Fahrenheit 451's televised helicopter fugitive chase to the television-as-babysitter of "The Veldt" (1950), we live in the real world that his fiction had warned us about.