failover


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failover

(reliability)
Automatically switching to a redundant or standby server, system, or network upon the failure or abnormal termination of the currently-active server, system, or network (a "hot standby" or "warm standby"). Failover happens without human intervention. This feature is usually built-in to expensive systems which must be available continuously.

failover

Invoking a secondary system to take over when the primary system fails. Up-to-date copies of all required data and applications are maintained on the secondary system in order to respond immediately if the primary system becomes unusable. Also called "fallover." See replication.
References in periodicals archive ?
When their failover monitor detects that one or more servers are having an error, it pulls out the IP addresses of those servers and change your IP with remaining available servers.
Scott Dennison, Director of Marketing, Exacq Technologies, said : "The new ESM Failover feature adds substantial value to our exacqVision enterprise solution.
Greg Hopp, director of technology at the $357 million BMI FCU in Dublin, Ohio, an early adopter of Hosted Failover, said, "There is always a security risk when having a courier transport tapes to another branch.
This forced failover test was extremely positive and fast enough to keep all 5 videos streaming.
Local and Remote Synchronous Data Mirroring and Failover
But in a storage network, even a single application might be pathing all over the place--running over multiple HBAs and switches, being shunted about for load balancing, or following automatic failover paths.
Moreover, the product contains a high-availability test suite for automating the testing of JMS applications under ongoing failover conditions (e.
Egenera's diskless Processing Blade(TM) design and PAN Manager(TM) software enable automated allocation, repurposing and failover since any server can assume the identity of any other.
They offer a number of distinct advantages to IT administrators, including failover in the case of server failure, the ability to repartition workload on multiple servers, alternate network links in case of link failure, disaster recovery, and minimizing the management of multiple individual systems.