Fairy Play

Fairy Play

 

(in French, féerie). (1) A type of play based on the use of stage effects, stunts, and transformation scenes. Special stage machinery and sound and lighting effects are used to depict fantastic or unusual events.

The fairy play originated in Italy in the 17th century and underwent further development in Great Britain. Many operas and ballets, as well as theatrical performances at fairs in France in the 17th and 18th centuries, were similar to fairy plays. In the early 19th century fairy plays were staged in Russia in balagans (seeBALAGAN) at open-air gatherings. The fairy plays staged in the second half of the 19th century by the director M. V. Lentovskii and the stage engineer K. F. Val’ts were marked by spectacular stage effects and brilliant inventiveness.

(2) A circus performance that uses varied stage effects.

References in periodicals archive ?
Liverpool-born Clarice Lockstone made her West End debut in 1899 in the musical fairy play The Snow Man.
Nick at last dredged up the subject of the fairy play and remembered his concern.
Buccola goes on to show how, through the fairy play staged in the final scene, Shakespeare is able to comment obliquely on religious reform and allow a female character (Anne Page) to broker her own marriage.
Buccola seeks to redress this by reconstructing the belief system and representational forms of the "fairy faithful" and revealing how our understanding of several fairy plays by Shakespeare and Jonson must be modified in alignment with early modern audiences' perceptions of fairy beliefs.
On stage, the fairy play of the 1840s and '50s was a pioneering Gesamtkunstwerk, a grand spectacle combining music, dance, costume, elaborate stage sets, and special effects (27).
His plays included a modern legend, Le Dernier Empereur (1926; "The Last Emperor"), and a popular fairy play, Dix filles dans un pre (1926; "Ten Girls in a Meadow").
In October 1899, he writes to Lady Gregory, his friend and benefactor at Coole Park (now sadly demolished) that he is leaving a copy of Fiona Macleod's fairy play, The Shadowy Waters, for her to read.
He wrote poems and short stories; novels, of which Memoirs of a Midget (1921) achieved the greatest poetic fantasy; a fairy play, Crossings (1921); and essays and literary studies.
In turn, Fimli traces in chapter 3 the potential impact of Victorian fairy plays and of fashionable paintings on the Tolkien of the 1910s, showing that the author had a place for flower-fairies in his early Quenya Lexicon.
In spite of Hazlitt's warning a century ago that 'the boards of the theatre and the regions of fancy are not the same thing', Christopher Wood, in this very beautiful book, which is joyful in both its remarkable contents and its illustrations, can point out that throughout the Victorian period, and in spite of Hazlitt, there was certainly no lack of productions of Shakespeare's fairy plays.