fallout shelter

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fallout shelter

[′fȯl‚au̇t ‚shel·tər]
(civil engineering)
A structure that affords some protection against fallout radiation and other effects of nuclear explosion; maximum protection is in reinforced concrete shelters below the ground. Also known as radiation shelter.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fallout shelter

A structure (or room therein) used for protection against harmful radiation due to radioactive fallout following a nuclear blast.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
New York City education officials announced last month they are taking down the fallout shelter signs at schools.
It produced a series of pamphlets including, "Your Basement Fallout Shelter" and "Fallout on the Farm." These pamphlets, while boldly admitting that "hundreds of thousands of Canadians might be killed or injured," subtly promoted the idea that a nuclear exchange was just another blip in the road, not an apocalyptic catastrophe.
(3) Moreover, the allegation, even if it were true, is irrelevant to the issue of fallout shelters for citizens downwind from the blast zone.
But Zars and company weathered the drought by building nuclear fallout shelters. "After President Kennedy started recommending fallout shelters as a backup, it became a good move for us," he said.
But Kirk's book does not read as a dated document from the era of fallout shelters and "Father Knows Best." Even in the 1950s, The Conservative Mind was not of its time.
Find out what buildings in your area have been designated as fallout shelters, and give everyone in your household clear instructions about where these shelters are located.
Here again are those eerie photos of nattily dressed suburban families posing in model fallout shelters; the ineffable Herman Kahn thinking about the unthinkable; Bert the Turtle of "Duck and Cover" fame; the "Operation Alert" drills designed to spirit top federal officials out of Washington to secure locations; the impassioned debate over the morality of shooting one's neighbor at the shelter door, and much else.
A close second was his nationally televised 1961 speech in which he bluntly threatened to go to war with the Soviets over Berlin, putting long-range bombers on 15 minutes' alert and warning Americans to start building fallout shelters. Perlstein calls the speech "the most terrifying of the Gold War" and adds: "Later Barry Goldwater would say the same kinds of things during the 1964 presidential campaign, and people would call him a madman."
6, January 2002), I should point out that, in the late 1950s, a huge amount of money was spent to stock fallout shelters in American cities.
In the 1960s, Americans fantasized about fallout shelters stocked with canned goods and ammunition.
AMERICANS NEVER ACTUALLY had to live in fallout shelters, but shelters wound up living in us: Forty years after nuke-fearing suburbanites set about digging up their backyards, the underground sanctuary survives as a supreme example of mid-century kitsch, the civil-defense version of the malt shop.
Former students of mine, many of whom are now pastoring, tell of spending nights in basement fallout shelters (again), of fears that young men will be hit with conscription (again), of regrets that the diplomats and foreign missionaries have abandoned the scene (again).